Friday March 22, 2019

Kidney Transplant becomes New Possibility to cure Terminally-Ill Kidney Patients in US

The patients with the transplanted kidney are treated for Hepatitis C

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November 2, 2016: Thousands of people with failing kidneys may soon have a better chance of surviving with a transplanted kidney, but with added risk of receiving a potentially deadly disease. Some patients and doctors say it’s better to contract a disease that can be kept under control than to die while waiting for a healthy kidney.

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For almost 100,000 people in the US, finding a suitable kidney donor is their only hope of returning to a normal life without painful dialysis several times a week, but there are only about 17,000 healthy kidneys available each year. About 4 percent of patients on the transplant waiting list die each year before they receive a kidney. Doctors say the availability of kidneys can be increased but with some additional risk.

Dr Peter Reeves from the University of Pennsylvania says, “We are giving them the opportunity to have a transplant but we are also treating them for a new infection they didn’t have. So that is the trade-off.”

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In a pioneering experiment conducted jointly at the University of Pennsylvania in Johns Hopkins University, doctors are offering to transplant kidneys from disease donors infected with Hepatitis C, a virus-borne disease that attacks the liver but keeps kidneys intact.

Patients who receive such kidneys are no longer required to endure dialysis but have to start taking drugs to keep Hepatitis C in check. The drugs are not cheap and in a small number of cases may not work. After long talks with doctors about all possible outcomes of the procedure some patients accepted the risk.

According to Irma Hendricks, a kidney transplant recipient, “If they didn’t have this study, I wouldn’t be where I am today. So I am extremely grateful.”

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The concept has become popular after the discovery of a new and more effective drug that promises to cure ninety-five percent of Hepatitis C patients. Researchers say, if the clinical trials proves to successful, hundreds of available kidneys may become available for saving the lives of patients with incurable kidney disease.

– prepared by NewsGram Team

Next Story

The World Looks Forward To Eradication Of Hepatitis C By 2030

Offering direct-acting antivirals to all patients at the time of diagnosis could prevent 640,000 deaths from liver cancer and cirrhosis by 2030

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the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
The team found that implementing comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures was estimated to reduce the number of new infections in 2030 by 58 per cent.

Improvements in screening, prevention and treatment particularly in high-burden countries, such as India, China and Pakistan, can avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030.

Globally, it is estimated that 71 million individuals are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus, that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation.

The virus was also responsible for over 475,000 deaths in 2015.

Viral hepatitis
World Health Organization poster for Hepatitis Campaign. VOA

To achieve the big reductions, there is need to implement comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures, extend harm reduction services (such as opioid substitution therapy and needle and syringe programmes) and replace older treatments with direct-acting antivirals in all countries.

Moreover, adding screening to these interventions can help diagnose 90 per cent of people with hepatitis C and offer treatment by 2030, according to the study published in The Lancet journal.

The estimates equal to an 80 per cent reduction in incidence and a 60 per cent reduction in deaths as compared to 2015.

Injection and medicines
Hepatitis are the commonly transmitted hepatotropic viruses transmitted due to poor hygiene, contaminated food and drinking water, poor sanitation, Pixabay

But, it narrowly misses the elimination targets set by the World Health Organisation (WHO) — to reduce mortality by 65 per cent — and would instead be attained by 2032, the researchers said.

“Even though it narrowly falls short of the WHO targets for 2030, the impact our estimates suggest would be a tremendous stride forwards,” said lead author Professor Alastair Heffernan, from UK’s Imperial College London.

The team found that implementing comprehensive blood safety and infection control measures was estimated to reduce the number of new infections in 2030 by 58 per cent.

Hepatitis C Blood Virus [HCV]. Photo Credit: michelsonmedical.org
Extending harm reduction services to 40 per cent of people who inject drugs could reduce the number of new infections by a further 7 percentage points.

Together, this would prevent 14.1 million new infections by 2030.

But, offering direct-acting antivirals to all patients at the time of diagnosis could prevent 640,000 deaths from liver cancer and cirrhosis by 2030, the researchers noted.

Also Read: Major Breakthrough Made In The Treatment Of Ebola Virus

“Achieving such reductions requires a massive screening programme and demands a rapid increase in new treatment courses in the short term — namely, 51.8 million courses of direct-acting antivirals by 2030,” Heffernan said. (IANS)