Sunday June 16, 2019

Kids Who Sleep Less Eat More

This is the first study that directly links sleep to energy intake in children under age three

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The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.
The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection. Pixabay

Parents, please take note of your child’s sleeping habit as researchers have now found that children who sleep less tend to eat more which increases risk of obesity and related health problems later in life.

The study found that 16 month-old children who slept for less than 10 hours a day consumed around 10 percent more calories on average than children who slept for more than 13 hours.

“The key message here is that shorter sleeping children may prone to consume too many calories,” said Abi Fisher of the Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

This is the first study that directly links sleep to energy intake in children under age three.

In the study that involved 1,303 British families, researchers monitored sleep when children were 16 months old and diet at 21 months old.

While the exact causes remain unclear, the regulation of appetite hormones may become disrupted by shorter sleeping patterns, the study suggested.

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“Although more research is needed to understand why this might be, it is something parents should be made aware of,” Fisher noted.

The study appeared in the International Journal of Obesity. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Physical Activities Powers Kids to Fight Emotional Distress: Study

Being less emotionally distressed at the juncture between elementary and high school is a priceless benefit for children as they are about to enter a much larger universe with bigger academic challenges

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IOC, Olympic, India, tokyo games, pakistan
FILE - Shimaa Hashad of Egypt takes part in a pratice session with an air rifle at the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) World Cup at Dr. Karni Singh Shooting Range, in New Delhi, Feb. 20, 2019. VOA

Parents, please take note. Kids who engage in organised physical activity at a young age are less likely to have emotional difficulties later in life, says a study.

Besides keeping children from being sedentary, physical activities such as structured sports have the potential to be enriching, both physically and mentally, said the study, published in the journal Pediatric Research.

“The elementary school years are a critical time in child development, and every parent wants to raise a well-adjusted child,” said study lead author Frederic N. Briere, Professor at the University of Montreal in Canada.

For the study, the researchers took data from a cohort of children born in 1997 or 1998. They examined whether consistent participation in organised sport from ages six to 10 would minimize risks associated with emotional distress, anxiety, shyness, and social withdrawal at age 12.

Women's sports and the surrounding sexism
Women’s sports (Representational image). Pixabay

“The results revealed that children who participated consistently from ages six to 10 showed fewer instances of those factors at age 12 than their counterparts who did not engage in physical activity in a consistent way,” said Briere.

Also Read- Study Finds Consuming Poultry as Bad as Red Meats for Cholesterol

“Getting kids actively involved in organised sport seems to promote global development. This involvement appears to be good on a socio-emotional level and not just because of physical benefits,” he added.

Being less emotionally distressed at the juncture between elementary and high school is a priceless benefit for children as they are about to enter a much larger universe with bigger academic challenges, said the researcher. (IANS)