Sunday January 21, 2018

Knowing why cows ‘moo’ will leave you amused for sure

When cows enter into her breeding period, she gets very local. They don’t want to wait around for one so they let bulls know via mooing that they are ready to make calves

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cows are sensitive animals, Wikimwdia commons
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Today researchers are trying to formulate what exactly cows are saying when they moo. This helps them to understand more deeply about how cows communicate with each other.

Jared Decker, a cattle geneticist at the University of Missouri says that “I can’t translate cow moos into English, but there are certain times when you can tell when the cattle are communicating with one another.”

AlmKuh_01wiki (1)
Cow ‘moo’, Wikimedia commons

Reasons behind mooing that you will find amusing

  • Finding friends – Cows moo in order to find new friends when they go to a new location. When cows are shifted to a new environment then they moo and figure out their surroundings. Mooing is the way of their investigating. Cows like plain and boring routines but given a chance they also like to explore new lands with their friends.
  • In search of a boyfriend – When cows enter into her breeding period, she gets very local. They don’t want to wait around for one so they let bulls know via mooing that they are ready to make calves.
  • In search of their calf or their mother – When a mother cow is not able to find her calf then she makes a loud, high pitched moo call. When their calves are close a significant decrease in frequency of their moo has been noticed. Calves moo when they need milk and also when they need their mother. Moms and babies recognize each other voices.
  • I’m hungry – Cows moo when they are hungry. This time, their call is for the farmer to give them some hay. They will complain if their stomach is empty.
  • Want to be milked – Cows are very generous animals. They don’t demand anything except for punctual milking schedules. If one is not punctual and goes few hours late then they become all cranky and start mooing telling to hurry up.
  • Time to play – Cows have their playtime. They like to play with other cows. Cows will playfully moo when they are head butting with each other or when they are jumping around.
Exploring lands, Wikimedia ommons
Exploring lands, Wikimedia commons

So be it cow-municating or Com’moo’nicating, we know now why do cows moo.

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-by Pritam

Pritam is pursuing engineering and is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle: @pritam_gogreen

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • AJ Krish

    It is quite interesting to know why cows ‘moo’.It is hilarious!

Next Story

Amul: Setting new standards in Indian advertising

While Amul’s topicals ads were very popular, they also posed a challenge – they needed to be released quickly or else, they would lose much of their impact.

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Amul is a farmers' cooperation whose ad campaigns have helped it compete with big private giants. Wikimedia Commons
Amul is a farmers' cooperation whose ad campaigns have helped it compete with big private giants. Wikimedia Commons

Amul was the result of a cooperative movement in 1946, against Polson, which allegedly procured milk at low rates from farmers in Gujarat to it sell to the Bombay government.

Today jointly owned by 3.6 million milk producers in Gujarat, it is a brand managed by a cooperative body the Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd. (GCMMF), which was formed in 1948.

Amul is worth 5 billion today. However, how come a farmers’ cooperative was successful in creating a brand name that would compete with its private competitors?

The story started nine years after the brand name Amul was registered, the story of ‘Amul girl’.

Amul's topical ads helped Amul gain its footing.
Amul’s topical ads helped Amul gain its footing.

An advertising agency comes in

In 1957, Dr. Verghese Kurien, founding-chairman, decided to advertise the products and hired an advertising agency called Advertising and Sales Promotion (ASP).

Their team was headed by Sylvester daCunha and Eustace Fernandes. They came up with the line ‘Utterly Butterly Delicious’ in 1966. Fernandes, who was an art director, designed the Amul girl.

The agency opted for outdoor hoardings, as advertising in television or print was not as simple as it is today. ASP’s team knew, if they wanted this to be a long-term campaign, with the Amul girl being the face of the brand, they needed to look beyond her association with food.

The Amul girl went topical for the first time when she addressed the Naxalite movement in Bengal. The movement was a major at that time and ‘Cholbe na, cholbe na’ was their slogan. That’s when daCunha came up with an idea for a hoarding in Kolkata- Bread without Amul Butter, cholbe na cholbe na.

Apparently, that indeed was the first topical but even the first unintentionally controversial Amul hoarding. It was treated as a success, and the Amul girl began her journey to being an opinion leader on current issues.

Amul's ads are often on the current issues.
Amul’s ads are often on the current issues.

While Amul’s topicals ads were very popular, they also posed a challenge – they needed to be released quickly or else, they would lose much of their impact.

Realizing that the protocol and logistics of approving and releasing an ad took a lot of time, Dr. Varghese Kurien gave DaCunha the freedom to run the campaign without waiting to take permission from the company.

By 1969, Fernandes moved on to form Raedeus Advertising while Sylvester founded daCunha Communications, which continued with the Amul campaign.

How the ad campaign works now

  • Choose one issue that has been trending for the week.
  • Choose a witty punch-line.
  • Make a ‘hand-painted’ visual (the unique part).

And that’s the perfect recipe for an Amul topical.

The sketch is then posted on Amul’s social media handles, while some make their way into newspapers and on hoardings. A ‘topical’ is churned out almost five days a week across multiple platforms—200 hoardings across the country, leading national and regional newspapers, as well as on social media platforms.

The relevance of Amul girl today

Amul girl is a mascot. Mascots were necessary for earlier days for brands because of the lack of literacy. It was a form of trade-marking at a time when people could not read and identification was done visually i.e. it was image led and brands would trade-mark the image. However, eventually, mascots became irrelevant.

For example, the Maharaja created for Airlines, in 1946 by SK Kooka and Umesh Rao of advertising agency J Walter Thompson. Earlier, aviation services were limited to a few rich people. Hence, they had chosen a Maharaja. Though after the merger of Indian Airlines and Air India in 2006, he was changed to slim from fat and was made stand straight instead of bent forward. Also, with the changing profile of the Indian flyer, and with the airline connecting smaller cities and not just metros, the Maharaja donned new clothes.

Eventually, celebrities came into the picture, as they were a short-cut to brand recognition. In contrast to mascots which require time, investment, and a danger of becoming irrelevant, celebrities gave quick results.

But through the downfall and makeovers of her major counterparts, from Maharaja to Gattu, from the shortcuts to celebrities and several controversies, the wide-eyed Amul girl has been and survived it all.