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Lab-Grown Meat Could Be in Restaurants in 3 Years

Some advocates have claimed the term - clean meat - while opponents in the traditional farm sector suggest - synthetic meat - is more appropriate

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FILE - Professor Mark Post holds the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, Aug. 5, 2013. Mosa Meat, a Dutch company that presented the world's first lab-grown beef burger five years ago, said July 17, 2018, it has received funding to pursue its plans to make and sell artificially grown meat to restaurants from 2021. VOA

A Dutch company that presented the world’s first lab-grown beef burger five years ago said Tuesday it has received funding to pursue its plans to make and sell artificially grown meat to restaurants from 2021.

Mosa Meat said it raised 7.5 million euros ($8.8 million), mainly from M Ventures and Bell Food Group. M Ventures is an investment vehicle for German pharmaceuticals company Merck KGaA. Bell Food is a European meat processing company based in Switzerland.

Smaller investors include Glass Wall Syndicate, which supports several companies looking into cultured meat or meat substitute products aimed at consumers concerned about the environmental and ethical impact of raising and slaughtering animals.

Maastricht-based Mosa Meat, which has in the past also received 1 million euros from Google co-founder Sergey Brin, said it hopes to sell its first products – most likely ground beef for burgers – in 2021. The aim is to achieve industrial-scale production 2-3 years later, with a typical hamburger patty costing about $1.

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The big challenge is making meat that looks, feels and tastes like the real thing. Pixabay

Environmentalists have warned that the world’s growing appetite for meat, particularly in emerging economies such as China, isn’t sustainable because beef, pork and poultry require far greater resources than plant-based proteins. Cows in particular also produce large amounts of greenhouse gas that contribute to global warming.

The big challenge is making meat that looks, feels and tastes like the real thing. Mosa Meat uses a small sample of cells taken from a live animal. Those cells are fed with nutrients so that they grow into strands of muscle tissue. The company claims it could make up to 80,000 quarter pounders from a single sample.

Also Read: Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility

With a number of startups and established players hoping to make cultured meat on a big scale in the coming years, a battle has broken out over the terms used to describe such products.

Some advocates have claimed the term – clean meat – while opponents in the traditional farm sector suggest – synthetic meat – is more appropriate. (VOA)

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Uber Eats Builds Strong Linkages With Restaurant Partners In India

Uber Eats ties-up with restaurant partners in India to stay put in the growing food tech industry

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Uber Eats
Uber Eats is going to stay put in the growing food tech industry in India. Wikimedia Commons

BY BHARAT UPADHYAY

Uber Eats is not only going to stay put in the growing food tech industry in India but is also building strong linkages with restaurant partners for a seamless delivery experience for its customers, a senior company executive said on Friday.

Without diverging much details on whether the company is going to take the grocery delivery service route soon, Bansi Kotecha who is Head of Operations, Uber Eats told IANS that currently, food tech industry is a massive opportunity and they are focused on improving food delivery with restaurant partners in the country.

In the next three years, the food tech industry in India is going to grow from $4 billion to $15 billion.

“This industry is perfect for Uber Eats. Right now, we are more focused on delivery with the restaurant partners. We are learning in the India market and making our mark in that space before we can add anything more to it,” Kotecha told IANS.

Talking about the difference between Uber Eats and the other food delivery platforms, Kotecha elaborated: “We are present in 500-plus cities across the globe. What we thrive on is our tech enablement. We have perfected the art of working through restaurant partners in making sure that the delivery experience is impeccable for all kinds of market places”.

Uber Eats that came to India in May 2017 is witnessing fast adoption of its services among millennials. Uber Eats’ business grew by 50 per cent (month-on-month) in its first year of operations in India.

The company still has to lot of ground to cover, in order to compete with Zomato or Swiggy that are leading the food tech industry.

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Uber Eats is witnessing fast adoption of its services among millennials. Wikimedia Commons

To achieve that, Uber Eats is “making sure that consumers are able to get most value out of the entire delivery experience”.

“At the beginning, people looked at ordering from the same restaurant. Now, we are getting into space where people are searching for a cuisine, searching for a dish. They are not searching for only restaurants anymore,” explained Kotecha.

On future plans, Kotecha said that in the last two years, they have witnessed double-digit growth and are now present in 44 cities in India.

“We are fast penetrating into tier II and III markets. We have perfected the art of managing restaurant partners, making sure that we understand the nuances of what it takes to succeed in a market like India,” Kotecha added.

Also Read- India Second to US in Demanding Facebook User Data, Requests Up by 37%

Uber Eats on Friday launched a new marketing campaign titled #EatsNewEveryday featuring Alia Bhatt and Dulquer Salmaan. The campaign targets youth between the ages of 18 and 25 and addresses their need to seek new experiences while ordering food.

“The campaign aims to create awareness and generate brand love among consumers, especially youth who’re looking for convenience and want to maximize their experiences on the platform,” Kotecha said. (IANS)