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Living in Exile since 1994: India is My Home, says Bangladeshi Writer Taslima Nasreen

By questioning inhumanity, inequality, unscientific and irrational aspects of the religion, like other religion, Islam too can achieve enlightenment, said Taslima

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Tasleema Nasrin, Flickr
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CANACONA, GOA, November 5, 2016:  Living in exile since 1994, noted Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen today said that she will now call India her home and it is unfortunate that she has no alternative but to live in exile for rest of her life.

“I have been living in exile since 1994. I know I have no other alternative but to live in exile for rest of my life. I feel I have nowhere to go or country to return to. I say now India is my country, India is my home,” the 54-year-old writer told the gathering at the “India Ideas Conclave 2016”, currently underway in Goa, mentioned PTI.

The event is organised by India Foundation.

“How much more we have to suffer at the hands of fundamentalists and their political allies for daring to articulate the truth. Even after all that has happened, I still believe, that sincere honest truly secular part of the continent, India is the safe refuge, only refuge,” said the writer to PTI.

By questioning inhumanity, inequality, unscientific and irrational aspects of the religion, like other religion, Islam too can achieve enlightenment, said Taslima by referring to the fundamentalists.

“The narrow-minded and the political (people) will forever throw society into the darkness, quiet a handful others will always strive for the betterment of society and good sense will prevail.”

It is only a few special people who seek to dream about change, and it has always been like that, said Nasreen, the writer of a much-acclaimed book “Lajja”.

While talking about Bangladesh, she said, “I truly hope that the secular movement in my country will begin and turn into positive political movement for true democracy and secular state. The state which will govern on equality and educational system that is secular, scientific.”

“People must know that Islam must not be exempted from the critical scrutiny that applies all other religions as well,” further added the writer.

– prepared by NewsGram with inputs from PTI.

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  • P. B. Josh

    India never had any problem with true seculars who love all religions equally or who hate all religions equally.

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Artist Renuka Rajiv Takes on Society, Gender Through Personal Narrative

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the "need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages."

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Rajiv described the prints as a "cathartic series" made while living in Melbourne. Flickr Commons

Exhibiting the interplay between words and visuals, a solo show by artist Renuka Rajiv critically chronicles and comments on matters of sexuality, gender, physicality and notions of family and relationships via personal narratives.

“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition, showing different renditions of fabric and paper using drawings, paper mache, tie-dye and embroidery.

It is on at the Vahdera Art Gallery here till August 18.

It includes a large body of textile and embroidery works, sculptures, and twenty four monotypes selected from a larger series of three hundred prints.

The fabric works are mostly made with old garments of the artist’s family and friends.

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“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition. Flickr Common

“This is a moment in a long-term exploration of expressing the aspects of my reality that are outside the material world,” the Bengaluru-based artist said about the exhibition.

Rajiv described the prints as a “cathartic series” made while living in Melbourne.

Some drawings also weave visuals with verbal interjections — sharp observations around gender and sexuality within the larger social context.

“With a strong inclination towards the spontaneously created “hand-made” works, the exhibition accommodates the imaginative, observational and autobiographical,” Vahdera Art Gallery said in a statement.

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the “need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages”.

Also Read: US Painted in New Colours By a Refugee Artist

Rajiv was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award (EAA) 2016, awarded by the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (FICA) in collaboration with Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

The exhibition is a culmination of the award process including a three-month residency in Switzerland in 2017. (IANS)