Monday May 27, 2019
Home Science & Technology Love to wear ...

Love to wear designer perfumes? Well, Your perfumes may pollute environment!

Samples collected during conditions of low tide showed concentrations comparable to those of untreated waste water, the study revealed

3
//
These Essential bottles can be harmful. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.

VENICE: Sept 07, 2016: Love to wear designer perfumes? Be careful, as certain molecules produced in these man-made fragrances act as potential contaminants of the environment, and may also impact our ecosystem, in the long run, said a study conducted in the canals of Venice, also known as the city without sewers.

Investigating the canals of Venice, the researchers looked for traces of molecules referred to as “perfumes” in the ingredients of products such as soaps, detergents, shampoos and many other personal hygiene products that we use daily.

The findings showed traces of “scented” molecules, including those more distant from inhabited areas, though concentrations were up to 500 times higher in the inner city canals.

Samples collected during conditions of low tide showed concentrations comparable to those of untreated waste water, the study revealed.

“The study confirms that fragrances are released continuously into the canals of Venice, both during high and low tide and in the historic centre and the lagoon,” said Marco Vecchiato, post-doctoral student at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice in Italy.

One of the most frequently found compounds in the waters of the lagoon was benzyl salicylate — a chemical compound used in cosmetics as a fragrance additive or UV light absorbed and also known to cause dermal irritation.

Thus, venice’s existing system of treating wastewater through biological tanks which then flows directly into the canals, seems an insufficient method of lowering the concentration of these molecules, the study said.

However, according to the data, the concentrations seem to be below the threshold for acute toxicity to marine organisms.

“But, we do not know the consequences of prolonged exposure to low doses of these substances,” Vecchiato said.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

For the study, the scientists repeatedly collected water samples from 22 places between the inner canals in the historic centre of Venice, the island of Burano and at two points in the far-north lagoon, between April and December 2015.

They were looking for the presence of 17 fragrances among the most used and chemically stable, between the thousands available to the cosmetics industry.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

The results were published in the journal “Science of the total environment”. (IANS)

 

  • Antara

    Our colossal usage of chemically developed “perfumed” products should be kept in check! Ecosystem shouldn’t suffer for human luxury!

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    The use of these chemically developed perfumes should be reduced.. or rather stopped.. we have to keep things balanced in the ecosystem, and if this is affecting we should stop

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    Most people don’t know about the effects that these perfumes have on environment. Very enlightening

SHARE
  • Antara

    Our colossal usage of chemically developed “perfumed” products should be kept in check! Ecosystem shouldn’t suffer for human luxury!

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    The use of these chemically developed perfumes should be reduced.. or rather stopped.. we have to keep things balanced in the ecosystem, and if this is affecting we should stop

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    Most people don’t know about the effects that these perfumes have on environment. Very enlightening

Next Story

Air Pollution Raises Anxiety, Depression Risks in Kids, Says Study

Among those exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollution, there were significant increases of myo-inositol in brain compared with those with lower pollution exposure

0
rahul gandhi, environment
A recent report had said that 22 of the world's 30 worst cities for air pollution are in India, with Delhi again ranking as the world's most polluted capital. VOA

A new evidence suggests air pollution is not just associated with asthma and respiratory diseases, but may also impact metabolic and neurological development of children, putting them at an increased risk of anxiety and depression, says a study.

“Recent evidence suggests the central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to air pollution, suggesting a role in etiology of mental disorders, like anxiety or depression,” said study lead author Kelly Brunst, Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati in the US.

“This is the first study to use neuro-imaging to evaluate exposure to traffic-related air pollution, metabolite dysregulation in brain and generalised anxiety symptoms among otherwise healthy children,” Brunst said.

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Research, the researchers evaluated imaging of 145 children at an average age of 12 years, looking specifically at levels of myo-inositol in brain through a specialised MRI technique, magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

India, air pollution, WHO, diwali, Pollution, Delhi, egypt, air quality
A bird flies past the Humayun’s Tomb shrouded in smog in New Delhi, India. VOA

Myo-inositol is a naturally-occurring metabolite, mainly found in specialised brain cells known as glial cells, which assists in maintaining cell volume and fluid balance in brain and serves as a regulator for hormones and insulin in the body. Rise in myo-inositol levels correlate with increased population of glial cells, which often occurs in states of inflammation.

Among those exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollution, there were significant increases of myo-inositol in brain compared with those with lower pollution exposure, researchers said.

Also Read- Micro-blogging Site Twitter Records 400 mn Tweets in 2019 Lok Sabha Polls

They also observed rise in myo-inositol to be associated with more generalised anxiety symptoms. “In the higher, recent exposure group, we saw a 12 per cent increase in anxiety symptoms,” said Brunst.

Brunst, however, noted that the observed increase in reported generalised anxiety symptoms in this cohort of typically developing children was relatively small and were not likely to result in a clinical diagnosis of an anxiety disorder. (IANS)