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Love to wear designer perfumes? Well, Your perfumes may pollute environment!

Samples collected during conditions of low tide showed concentrations comparable to those of untreated waste water, the study revealed

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These Essential bottles can be harmful. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.
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VENICE: Sept 07, 2016: Love to wear designer perfumes? Be careful, as certain molecules produced in these man-made fragrances act as potential contaminants of the environment, and may also impact our ecosystem, in the long run, said a study conducted in the canals of Venice, also known as the city without sewers.

Investigating the canals of Venice, the researchers looked for traces of molecules referred to as “perfumes” in the ingredients of products such as soaps, detergents, shampoos and many other personal hygiene products that we use daily.

The findings showed traces of “scented” molecules, including those more distant from inhabited areas, though concentrations were up to 500 times higher in the inner city canals.

Samples collected during conditions of low tide showed concentrations comparable to those of untreated waste water, the study revealed.

“The study confirms that fragrances are released continuously into the canals of Venice, both during high and low tide and in the historic centre and the lagoon,” said Marco Vecchiato, post-doctoral student at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice in Italy.

One of the most frequently found compounds in the waters of the lagoon was benzyl salicylate — a chemical compound used in cosmetics as a fragrance additive or UV light absorbed and also known to cause dermal irritation.

Thus, venice’s existing system of treating wastewater through biological tanks which then flows directly into the canals, seems an insufficient method of lowering the concentration of these molecules, the study said.

However, according to the data, the concentrations seem to be below the threshold for acute toxicity to marine organisms.

“But, we do not know the consequences of prolonged exposure to low doses of these substances,” Vecchiato said.

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For the study, the scientists repeatedly collected water samples from 22 places between the inner canals in the historic centre of Venice, the island of Burano and at two points in the far-north lagoon, between April and December 2015.

They were looking for the presence of 17 fragrances among the most used and chemically stable, between the thousands available to the cosmetics industry.

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The results were published in the journal “Science of the total environment”. (IANS)

 

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  • Antara

    Our colossal usage of chemically developed “perfumed” products should be kept in check! Ecosystem shouldn’t suffer for human luxury!

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    The use of these chemically developed perfumes should be reduced.. or rather stopped.. we have to keep things balanced in the ecosystem, and if this is affecting we should stop

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    Most people don’t know about the effects that these perfumes have on environment. Very enlightening

SHARE
  • Antara

    Our colossal usage of chemically developed “perfumed” products should be kept in check! Ecosystem shouldn’t suffer for human luxury!

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    The use of these chemically developed perfumes should be reduced.. or rather stopped.. we have to keep things balanced in the ecosystem, and if this is affecting we should stop

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    Most people don’t know about the effects that these perfumes have on environment. Very enlightening

Next Story

Levels of Air Pollution Directly Linked to Oral Cancer: Study

A significant association was also observed for ozone levels below 28.69-30.97 parts per billion

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Air Pollution
Air pollution linked to high risk of oral cancer: Study. Pixabay

Higher levels of air pollution may be linked to a heightened risk of developing oral cancer, which includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, a study has found.

While mouth cancers have been associated with smoking, drinking, human papilloma virus, and the chewing of betel quid (“paan”), the study added to this list increased levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and to lesser extent, ozone.

“This study, with a large sample size, is the first to associate oral cancer with PM2.5… These findings add to the growing evidence on the adverse effects of PM2.5 on human health,” said researchers including Shou-Jen Lan, Professor at the Asia University, in Taiwan.

Exposure to heavy metals and emissions from petrochemical plants are also thought to be implicated in the development of the disease while PM2.5 is known to be harmful to respiratory and cardiovascular health.

Previously, high air pollution has been linked to a host of health problems, from an increased risk of dementia to asthma and even changes in the structure of the heart, with recent research suggesting there is no “safe level” of air pollution.

Air Pollution
Air Pollution. pixabay

For the new study, published in the Journal of Investigative Medicine, the team discovered the association by looking at air pollution data from 66 air quality monitoring stations in Taiwan, collected in 2009.

They combined this with data from the health records of more than 4,80,000 men aged 40 and over from 2012-13. In total, there were 11,617 cases of mouth cancer among the participants.

They found that men exposed to the highest levels of PM2.5s had an increased risk of mouth cancer.

Compared with men exposed to average annual PM2.5 levels of 26.74 micrograms (µg) per cubic metre (m3) of air, those exposed to concentrations of 40.37 µg/m3 or higher had 43 per cent greater odds of developing the disease.

Air Pollution.
Air pollution may also lead to changes in heart structure. Pixabay

A significant association was also observed for ozone levels below 28.69-30.97 parts per billion.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), air pollution is responsible for an estimated 4.2 million premature deaths worldwide per year.

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Around 6,57,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed annually across the globe, with 3,30,000 of those patients dying, it said. (IANS)