Friday April 19, 2019

Mamata Banerjee-led West Bengal Government is likely to add Singur movement to school syllabus

The land of 997.11 acres was acquired for setting up Tata's small car-Nano factory in 2006 and the acquisition was vehemently protested by the peasants of Singur

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Government school
Children studying in School in India. Wikimedia Commons

Kolkata, September 3, 2016: The Mamata Banerjee-led West Bengal government on Friday said it is considering to incorporate the peasant’s movement in the state’s Singur in school syllabus and sending a proposal to the Syllabus Committee for its observation and evaluation.

“(State) school education department received proposals from all the sections of the society requesting to incorporate historical win of peasants in Singur in the school syllabus. The department is sending the entire matter to school syllabus committee for its observations and evaluation,” said Education Minister Partha Chatterjee.

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Welcoming the proposal, State Syllabus Committee Chairman Aveek Majumder said: “We will discuss with educational experts, education minister and all concerned people about how to incorporate the it in the syllabus.”

The land of 997.11 acres was acquired for setting up Tata’s small car-Nano factory in 2006. The acquisition was vehemently protested by the peasants of Singur.

Demanding return of 400 acres to “unwilling farmers” (from whom land was allegedly taken against their will), the then opposition Trinamool Congress-led byMamata Banerjeespearheaded a violent and sustained peasants movement that ultimately forced the automobile giants to shift its plant to Sanand in Gujarat.

Subsequently, civil society organisations, state government and Tatas moved to Calcutta High Court for seeking justice. The matter moved to Supreme Court.

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The apex court on Wednesday set aside the land acquisition by the previous Left Front Government in West Bengal and ordered to return the land to the owners within 12 weeks.

“In recent times, no mass movements except Singur have got recognition from the apex court. Student must learn it. Education Minister’s proposal is welcome and it is a right decision,” said Trinamool Congress Vice President Mukul Roy.

Opposition have termed the move as “a political decision”. (IANS)

 

  • asit guin

    Supreme
    court Justice Misra said the State’s policy to establish a small car industry
    would have “ultimately benefited the people and the very purpose of
    industrialisation.” The factory would have opened up job opportunities in the
    State and attracted investment. Justice Mishra concluded the acquisition did
    indeed qualify to be for a public purpose. SO , WHAT WENT WRONG ?

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  • asit guin

    Supreme
    court Justice Misra said the State’s policy to establish a small car industry
    would have “ultimately benefited the people and the very purpose of
    industrialisation.” The factory would have opened up job opportunities in the
    State and attracted investment. Justice Mishra concluded the acquisition did
    indeed qualify to be for a public purpose. SO , WHAT WENT WRONG ?

Next Story

New Survey Indicates, Indians Worry About Terrorism, Unemployment And Corruption The Most

"At least 73 per cent Indians are optimistic that as a nation we are headed in the right direction. The global average paints a dismal image, where the majority (58 per cent) feels that they are headed in the wrong direction," the findings showed.

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India
The "What Worries the World Global Survey" by global market research firm Ipsos showed that 45 per cent of Indians are most worried about terrorism, 44 per cent about unemployment and jobs and 42 per cent about financial and political corruption. Pixabay

 As the country entered the seven-phase voting from April 11, a new survey said on Monday that Indians are most worried about terrorism, followed by unemployment and corruption.

The “What Worries the World Global Survey” by global market research firm Ipsos showed that 45 per cent of Indians are most worried about terrorism, 44 per cent about unemployment and jobs and 42 per cent about financial and political corruption.

India

India, however, bucked the global trend of pessimism where 22 countries out of the total of the 28 markets covered in the survey felt their country is on the wrong track. Pixabay

Apart from these issues, a significant number of Indians are also concerned about crime and violence (33 per cent) and poverty and social inequality (29 per cent).

“Pulwama terror strike has propelled terrorism to the fore. It was way down in the pecking order in the past waves. Terrorism is bothering Indians most. Likewise, lack of jobs is weighing on the minds of Indians and government,” said Parijat Chakraborty, Service Line Leader, Ipsos Public Affairs, Customer Experience and Corporate Reputation.

“Similarly, more concrete steps are needed for tackling corruption. While strategies are being formulated by the government to address them, our survey shows that Indians are preoccupied with concerns around these macro issues and will like them to be mitigated,” Chakraborty added.

china
Meanwhile China (94 per cent) inspires the most confidence about its national direction as 9 in 10 Chinese citizens say that the country is moving in the right direction. Pixabay

India, however, bucked the global trend of pessimism where 22 countries out of the total of the 28 markets covered in the survey felt their country is on the wrong track.

“At least 73 per cent Indians are optimistic that as a nation we are headed in the right direction. The global average paints a dismal image, where the majority (58 per cent) feels that they are headed in the wrong direction,” the findings showed.

Meanwhile China (94 per cent) inspires the most confidence about its national direction as 9 in 10 Chinese citizens say that the country is moving in the right direction.

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Saudi Arabia is in the second place (84 per cent), followed by India (73 per cent) and Malaysia (57 per cent).

The survey was conducted in 28 countries where 20,019 interviews were conducted between February 22-March 8. (IANS)