Friday March 22, 2019
Home Indian Diaspora Manipuri Woma...

Manipuri Woman makes Naga Food a Rage in Belgium: Lulu’s Tribal Kitchen leaves people hungry for more!

Lulu's Tribal Kitchen serves simple North East Indian food, using authentic spices and condiments she imports from Imphal, Manipur.

0
//
Lulu's Kitchen. Image source: Facebook

Indian food has been a great hit among foreigners since a long time. Whether Indians set up food joints in other countries or foreigners visiting India, in both cases Indian cuisine is drool worthy to them. But it must be noted that most of the food across the borders is North Indian food- butter chickens and dal makhani and chicken tikkas. It is surprising to see how Lulu Pheiga, a woman from the Rongmei Naga tribe of Manipur, has made Naga food a ‘rage’ in Genk, Belgium.

Lulu's food truck reads 'Back to the roots' Source: Facebook
Lulu’s food truck reads ‘Back to the roots’. Source: Facebook

Her food truck named Lulu’s Tribal Kitchen serves simple North East Indian food, using authentic spices and condiments she imports from Imphal, Manipur.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Lulu says to theindiandiaspora.com, “It was only when I went to Delhi to work that I started trying out recipes and started looking out for the right ingredients. I would wait to go home to get the right stuff, or would wait for friends to bring along. Now that I am here, it’s the same story again! So I want to start import of local northeastern herbs which would benefit people who want to explore the cuisine as well as help the local farmers there.”

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

Authentic north East Indian food is popularly paired with rice. Source: Lulu's Kitchen @ Facebook
Authentic North-East Indian food is popularly paired with rice. Source: Lulu’s Kitchen @ Facebook

Food from north-eastern parts of India is also famous all over the nation, especially in North India due to its simplicity and exotic flavours. With the trend of food adaptation and modification or improvisation, authentic Naga food is a unique style of cuisine. Some of them are:

Here is a list of mouth-watering food items that you will find hard to resist!

– Smoked Pork: Meat or pork is hung above a Naga kitchen’s fire for several days until it is crispy on the outside and juicy inside. The food item is usually preferred with rice but you can try it with slices of bread as well.

– Bamboo Steamed Fish: Bamboo is one of the most famous ingredients of Naga food. In Bamboo Steamed Fish, fish is stuffed inside bamboo sticks’ tubes and flavored with light spices and it is cooked in steam. It is then emptied from the bamboo shoot can be eaten with a variety of sauce.

– Eromba: This healthy dish emerges from Manipur. Vegetables are boiled and mixed with smoked or roasted fish, and the fiery flavor of the world’s hottest chilli Raja Mirchi is added. Eromba is to be eaten with rice or Manipur’s millet bread.

The Indian Diaspora Website mentions, Lulu’s primary support is her husband, and the two wish to come up with a restaurant in northeast India that serves Belgium specialty dishes, which sounds like culture exchange at its best! This year in 2016, the couple are planning to visit Nagaland during the infamous Hornbill Festival along with some of their Belgian tourists, in an attempt to show the incredible north-east India is.

– prepared by Chetna Karnani of NewsGram. Twitter: @karnani_chetna

ALSO READ:

Next Story

The Dining Table Starts Turning To The DIEning Table, Is Eating Alone Healthy?

Orchestrating a family meal, day after day, was a chore that no one wanted to undertake and so the dining table witnessed a different kind of evolution. It became lonely.

0
dining
My version of a happy home is as delineated through my own experiences, so I am less than amused by this change. It is here that my perceptions of the halcyon days gone by conflicts with today's reality. Pixabay

I have grown up in a typical Punjabi household. The place was Patiala. During the peak of any season, our oddly planned, 50’s built house would be such a cacophony… the din

created by us all…family members of all age groups and sizes. For a child, the craze in those days was that of play, play and more play interspersed with food, food and more food.

And this household had generosity writ all over it. A buzzing, bustling kitchen with Biji (grandmother) ruling the roost, her palpable charm and grace was always as warm as the
sugar laden tea she offered you first thing, should you be our guest on any day, forget just a good day!

Sunday was the day for special indulgences where brunch was almost always outsourced Poori Chana Aloo (fat be damned) from Mota Halwai. Sonorous conversations happened
around the dining table. Eating together was therapeutic too because a lot of problems were solved across kitchen counters and dining tables.

food
We sat at that table for hours, far beyond the meals, just talking and laughing. The benefits went beyond health. It was nourishment of the soul and the body alike.
Pixabay

We had it all. Our generation, and the ones before us. We may not have had the sophisticated gadgetry of today’s times nor did we have the knowledge of the world on our finger tips but we did have our own small happy world knit together. We sat at that table for hours, far beyond the meals, just talking and laughing. The benefits went beyond health. It was nourishment of the soul and the body alike.

The dining table was then the deciding table. Indeed.

Nothing changed in my world as I graduated from my teens to my 20’s except the fact that I was now married with children. Life in the 90’s was simpler. Sunday was still an open
house… a family and friends communion of sorts. Feasts became larger because the number of loved ones grew tremendously. And since the humble mixie could no more churn out the humongous lassi portions fast enough, it was irrefutably replaced with a dedicated washing machine with its rattling rhythmic buzz, perched right within the large kitchen.

Yes you heard it right. To churn lassi in bucketfuls. Sounds like privileges that are beyond the ordinary? Stuff that legends are made of probably! Even if it was just one big cauldron of home cooked mutton curry served with a “never-counted-never-ending” supply of tandoori rotis and raita, there was always more than enough for everyone. Those were the days when the dining table had enough scratches on it to prove that it had been a witness to countless feasts and fights, drinks and the drunk, the romance of meals à deux, love and lovers, in different measures. We may not have had it all together, but together, we had it all.

The dining table became the defining table. Indeed.

But that was then when life was comparatively simpler and eating together was the centrepoint of the day. The turn of the century turned the tables, literally and figuratively. The size of the family started to shrink as did the size of its generosity. Best friends and cousins were non grudgingly replaced with gadgets and communication was now happening via Skype and video chats. Visits became few and far fetched.

food
Dinners saw less and less of “you have to
eat all vegetables” kind of phrases and not many young mothers seemed to be sourcing recipes for Bottle Gourd or Panjiri anymore. Pixabay

Orchestrating a family meal, day after day, was a chore that no one wanted to undertake and so the dining table witnessed a different kind of evolution. It became lonely. Just like
the people who were eating on it somedays. The table was now mostly used as a work station, the laptop siting on it, once too often. Where once food garnered positivity and
camaraderie, now the simple, neatly laid out daily meals were replaced with quick “on the go” breakfasts and “at work” lunches. Dinners saw less and less of “you have to
eat all vegetables” kind of phrases and not many young mothers seemed to be sourcing recipes for Bottle Gourd or Panjiri anymore.

The parental engagement fostered around the table was fast depleting. Did we even need a full-fledged dining table? The practical acceptance of its now defunct utility and
importance was directly related to the disappearance of the family size and family meals. It was no more the centre of distribution for anything at all.

And the dining table started to be the DIEning table instead. Indeed.

My version of a happy home is as delineated through my own experiences, so I am less than amused by this change. It is here that my perceptions of the halcyon days gone by conflicts with today’s reality. When my children left home to pursue their dreams and lives, the first thing that felt really different was the dining table. My shared meals became limited to the Langar (community meals in gurdwaras) and social events. Food has always defined my existence and our mutual love for each other often evokes wistful sentiments of a once full family life.

Also Read: Lok Sabha 2019 Elections, EC Outlines Stringent Guidelines For Social Media Usage During Campaigns

With an increasing focus on eating food that benefits our health, we have definitely moved towards nutritionally better meals but from a psychological perspective, is eating alone healthy? Healthy enough? No amounts of supplements can infuse a rush of endorphins, like a happy chatter around the dinner table can. Once the unifier, the table stands alone
today. When did it become just a piece of furniture really? Maybe it’s time to create a home, all over again, around the diening table. One meal at a time.

And bring it back to life! After all there is nothing half as good as a household bonding over a meal. (IANS)