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Manipuri Woman makes Naga Food a Rage in Belgium: Lulu’s Tribal Kitchen leaves people hungry for more!

Lulu's Tribal Kitchen serves simple North East Indian food, using authentic spices and condiments she imports from Imphal, Manipur.

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Lulu's Kitchen. Image source: Facebook

Indian food has been a great hit among foreigners since a long time. Whether Indians set up food joints in other countries or foreigners visiting India, in both cases Indian cuisine is drool worthy to them. But it must be noted that most of the food across the borders is North Indian food- butter chickens and dal makhani and chicken tikkas. It is surprising to see how Lulu Pheiga, a woman from the Rongmei Naga tribe of Manipur, has made Naga food a ‘rage’ in Genk, Belgium.

Lulu's food truck reads 'Back to the roots' Source: Facebook
Lulu’s food truck reads ‘Back to the roots’. Source: Facebook

Her food truck named Lulu’s Tribal Kitchen serves simple North East Indian food, using authentic spices and condiments she imports from Imphal, Manipur.

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Lulu says to theindiandiaspora.com, “It was only when I went to Delhi to work that I started trying out recipes and started looking out for the right ingredients. I would wait to go home to get the right stuff, or would wait for friends to bring along. Now that I am here, it’s the same story again! So I want to start import of local northeastern herbs which would benefit people who want to explore the cuisine as well as help the local farmers there.”

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Authentic north East Indian food is popularly paired with rice. Source: Lulu's Kitchen @ Facebook
Authentic North-East Indian food is popularly paired with rice. Source: Lulu’s Kitchen @ Facebook

Food from north-eastern parts of India is also famous all over the nation, especially in North India due to its simplicity and exotic flavours. With the trend of food adaptation and modification or improvisation, authentic Naga food is a unique style of cuisine. Some of them are:

Here is a list of mouth-watering food items that you will find hard to resist!

– Smoked Pork: Meat or pork is hung above a Naga kitchen’s fire for several days until it is crispy on the outside and juicy inside. The food item is usually preferred with rice but you can try it with slices of bread as well.

– Bamboo Steamed Fish: Bamboo is one of the most famous ingredients of Naga food. In Bamboo Steamed Fish, fish is stuffed inside bamboo sticks’ tubes and flavored with light spices and it is cooked in steam. It is then emptied from the bamboo shoot can be eaten with a variety of sauce.

– Eromba: This healthy dish emerges from Manipur. Vegetables are boiled and mixed with smoked or roasted fish, and the fiery flavor of the world’s hottest chilli Raja Mirchi is added. Eromba is to be eaten with rice or Manipur’s millet bread.

The Indian Diaspora Website mentions, Lulu’s primary support is her husband, and the two wish to come up with a restaurant in northeast India that serves Belgium specialty dishes, which sounds like culture exchange at its best! This year in 2016, the couple are planning to visit Nagaland during the infamous Hornbill Festival along with some of their Belgian tourists, in an attempt to show the incredible north-east India is.

– prepared by Chetna Karnani of NewsGram. Twitter: @karnani_chetna

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When You Engage in ‘Hedonic Consumption’? Read Here To Find Out

"Emotional consumption is usually food because it's easily accessible and available to most people,"

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Some research suggests "hedonic consumption" doesn't help because it could lead to a vicious cycle of eating unhealthily and its associated guilt factors. Pixabay

If you start binging on fast food, savour dark chocolates or can’t resist that ice cream, this may be because of an emotional event like a recent break-up as there is science behind this behaviour, says a study.

Reacting to emotional events like break-ups, tends to involve reaching for the nearest unhealthy snack which is called “hedonic consumption”, said Nitika Garg, Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) at Sydney Business School.

“When you engage in ‘hedonic consumption’, you always have some kind of emotion attached to it,” she added.

When you’re sad, you tend to go for overconsumption – hedonic consumption – as therapy.

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“We tend to focus on sadness and what it does to consumption but there’s also this unexpected good effect of happiness,” Garg suggested. Pixabay

“Be it ice cream or a luxury handbag, there are always emotions attached,” Garg said.

Research shows when people are made aware of emotion effects, they go away.

“One of the mechanisms to curbing hedonic consumption is making people aware of the behaviour by providing nutritional information,” Garg noted.

On the flip side, experiencing happiness actually curbs the consumption of unhealthy food products.

“Happiness is shown to increase the consumption of products people believe to be healthy,” said the professor.

In her research, the UNSW academic offered both M&M chocolates and sweet dried fruit sultanas to happy and sad people.

She found that happy people don’t eat M&Ms but they do eat sultanas a lot more.

“We tend to focus on sadness and what it does to consumption but there’s also this unexpected good effect of happiness,” Garg suggested.

sadness
When you’re sad, you tend to go for overconsumption – hedonic consumption – as therapy. Pixabay

Some research suggests “hedonic consumption” doesn’t help because it could lead to a vicious cycle of eating unhealthily and its associated guilt factors.

Also Read: “Worn-of-Women”: US Based Firm To Manufacture Female Condoms

“Emotional consumption is usually food because it’s easily accessible and available to most people,” said Garg who received a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh and MBA from IIM-Ahmedabad.

“People go for what seems easiest to them in terms of familiarity and in terms of accessibility for ‘hedonic consumption’,” the professor added. (IANS)