Sunday January 26, 2020

Meet Tuhin Das from Bangladesh: Poet, Activist and Writer in Exile

Tuhin Das says he began to write more serious articles as a witness to the rise of fundamentalism

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Bangladesh, Feb 17, 2017: I don’t know how I can express myself, as feelings become obtuse from fear. Soldiers of darkness caught me like an animal and butchered me in dreams. You know the feelings of dreaming are like reality. It is midnight in my Bangladesh.

Tuhin Das is from Bangladesh, but he lives now in exile. Forced to leave his home in April 2016, Tuhin Das sought refuge at City of Asylum Pittsburgh, a sanctuary for endangered writers.

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“I left my country in an extreme situation and I came here not for only security,” he said. “I came here for freedom, freedom of expression, freedom of writing and freedom for living a certain way.”

Tuhin Das
Tuhin Das, VOA

Born and raised in Barisal, Bangladesh, Tuhin Das loved to read poems. Tuhin began writing his own poems when he was in seventh grade. Some of his works were featured in a local children’s magazine.

“Basically, I write poetry because that is my voice, my soul voice. I wrote a few rhymes, like children(’s) poetry,” he said. “They were published in children’s magazines.”

Tuhin Das also started writing other things, like short stories. However, in the 1980s things changed in his country. A military dictator took control and established Islamic rule.

Tuhin Das says he began to write more serious articles as a witness to the rise of fundamentalism.

“When I started writing articles, basically our community in Bangladesh was ninety-four percent Muslims and they did not think [writing] is good because some feelings hurt them,” he remembers. “I wrote against war crimes, some war criminals in our country, and they are still in our country and they are doing their job. They were never condemned, so for that, we wrote against them.”

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Tuhin Das, VOA

However, freedom of expression came at a cost for Tuhin Das.

“Right now there are local collaborators of 1971, and right now in our country there are a lot of their supporters,” he said. “So, when we wrote against them and the supporters, sometimes online, they personally threatened us.”

To save his own life, Tuhin Das left Bangladesh.

Since 2013, Das has been the target of fundamentalist groups who have murdered freethinking bloggers, writers and editors. In Bangladesh, writers are being persecuted under the country’s Information and Technology Communication Law. Instead of protecting Tuhin, the police collected and searched his writings for anti-Islamic statements to use against him.

City of Asylum Pittsburgh has given exiled writer Tuhin Das a refuge.

“I think a lot of bad things have happened in our country and already 16 writers are murdered by the extremists so, right now, I am feeling safe here,” he said.” I am writing freely. Right now, I am writing a novel about (the) social structure of my country, basically the Islamization of my country.”

Tuhin Das appreciates the community support he is receiving. He joined the Greater Pittsburgh Literary Society where he is learning the English language and about American culture.

His work has continued to appear in Bangladesh. In his native language, Bengali, Das has authored seven poetry books. He has served as editor of several literary magazines, written short stories and published columns in his home country. He says his proudest accomplishment is the founding of a popular magazine called, The Wild.

However, Tuhin Das says he misses his Bangladeshi home and hopes one day to return there.

“I love my country and also my family, my parents and my nephew and my sisters and a lot of friends,” he said. “I think the situation of my country will be good and I will come back to my country. I hope that.”(VOA)

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“I feel that I still have to do a lot of work,” Says Veteran Writer-Lyricist Javed Akhtar

Javed Akhtar attended a photo exhibition organised on the occasion of his 75th birthday on Wednesday in Mumbai

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Veteran writer-lyricist Javed Akhtar says he still has to do a lot of work. Wikimedia Commons

Veteran writer-lyricist Javed Akhtar beams with energy at the age of 75 and says he still has to do a lot of work.

“A lot of people have achieved so much more than me. I feel I have earned love of friends. I feel that I still have to do a lot of work. I can do a lot of things. I can write much more poetry, lyrics and scripts. I can associate myself with causes in which I believe in. I can speak my mind at different panel discussions, so that I can bring in change in people’s mindset,” said Akhar, at a photo exhibition organised on the occasion of his 75th birthday on Wednesday in Mumbai.

Javed Akhtar
“A lot of people have achieved so much more than me,” says Javed Akhtar. Wikimedia Commons

Akhtar, who has been active in the film industry for nearly five decades now, said: “Every human being goes through good and bad, happy and sad times in his life. I feel people have to look at their grand total, and if you keep cribbing about your past then there is no use. If your grand total is correct and if you are happy with it, then you will feel happy.”

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Asked Akhtar what his kids had gifted him on his birthday, he said: “He (Farhan) has gifted me a really nice brown watch, so whenever I wear a brown kurta then I wear that watch. Zoya also gifts me things whenever she returns from her international trips but I feel she is the biggest gift of mine. What else I can ask for?”

Celebrities including Zoya Akhtar, Shabana Azmi, Farhan Akhtar, Shibani Dandekar, Sudhir Mishra, Divya Dutta, and Riteish Deshmukh attended the photo-exhibition. (IANS)