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Myntra’s first Smart wearable device Launched at Rs 4,199

The "Sleep Goals and Tools" lets users set a weekly sleep goal, create bedtime reminders and wake targets

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Myntra's first Smart wearable device Launched at Rs 4,199
Myntra's first Smart wearable device Launched at Rs 4,199, flickr
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Fashion e-tailer Myntra on Wednesday launched its “Blink Go” first smart wearable device at Rs 4,199.

The device allows users to monitor their fitness parameters and set personal fitness goals that include activity tracking — such as steps, distance, calories, sleep, and heart rate sensor.

“This is an exciting moment for Myntra as we foray into the connected wearable segment with our first product ‘Blink Go’ which is a perfect blend of fashion and technology to help our customers keep track of their goals and stay fit,” Jeyendran Venugopal, Chief Technology Officer, Myntra, said in a statement.

Ananth Narayanan CEO of myntra
Ananth Narayanan CEO of myntra, flickr

The “Sleep Goals and Tools” lets users set a weekly sleep goal, create bedtime reminders and wake targets.

Also read: Google reveals Top 10 and most Creative ‘India YouTube Ads’ that people choose to watch

“Leaderboards” feature allow users to challenge themselves and their friends on fitness tasks and goals. (IANS)

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NASA Postpones launch Of James Webb Space Telescope To 2021

The telescope's new total lifecycle cost, to support the revised launch date, is estimated at $9.66 billion

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Several other designs on the spacecraft keep Parker Solar Probe sheltered from the heat.Flickr

 NASA has postponed the launch of its flagship James Webb Space Telescope to early 2021 owing to a range of factors influencing its schedule and performance, including the technical challenges and tasks remaining before launch.

The telescope’s new total lifecycle cost, to support the revised launch date, is estimated at $9.66 billion; its new development cost estimate is $8.8 billion, the US space agency said in a statement.

An Independent Review Board (IRB) established by NASA to assess progress on the world’s premier science observatory unanimously recommended that its development should continue.

“Webb should continue based on its extraordinary scientific potential and critical role in maintaining US leadership in astronomy and astrophysics,” said Tom Young, the chair of the review board.

“Ensuring every element of Webb functions properly before it gets to space is critical to its success,” Young added.

The report showed that technical issues, including human errors, have greatly impacted the development schedule.

NASA has agreed to the review board’s expert guidance on decisive steps necessary to safeguard and complete the telescope’s development.

In a message to the NASA workforce, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said: “Webb is vital to the next generation of research beyond NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

Representational image. Pixabay

“Despite major challenges, the board and NASA unanimously agree that Webb will achieve mission success with the implementation of the board’s recommendations, many of which are already underway,” Bridenstine noted.

NASA previously had estimated an earlier launch date but the new launch date estimates to accommodate changes in the schedule due to environmental testing and work performance challenges by Northrop Grumman on the spacecraft’s sunshield and propulsion system.

The first telescope of its kind, and an unprecedented feat of engineering, Webb is at the very leading edge of technological innovation and development.

Also read:NASA’s Noise-Reduction Tech to Make Quieter Airports a Reality

From detecting the light of the first stars and galaxies in the distant universe to probing the atmospheres of exoplanets for possible signs of habitability, Webb’s world-class science not only will shed light on the many mysteries of the universe, it also will complement and further enhance the discoveries of other astrophysics projects. (IANS)