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Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose vs Mahatma Gandhi, who do we owe our freedom to?

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By Gaurav  Sharma

While popular opinion says that the freedom that we enjoy today is the result of the efforts of the Father of the Nation, would it be a delirious thought if Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose had more to do with ousting the British than Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi?

Let’s have a look at what Netaji did for us.

Even ahead of Gandhiji’s Quit India Movement, Bose had pressed that the Congress serve a six month ultimatum to the British during the Second World War. It was an apt opportunity that Bose thought could be taken advantage of in 1939. But the party spearheaded by Gandhiji refused to act.

Notably, the gearing of the Indian National Army to combat with the British Indian Army coincided with the start of Gandhiji’s Quit India Movement in 1942. The movement fizzled out a few months after it was crushed in three weeks time.

While the argument still remains whether either were effective in affecting the retreat of the British, what needs primacy here, is Babasaheb Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar’s interview with BBC’s Francis Watson in February 1955.

Ambedkar pondered as he recalled the then British Prime Minister’s move to retreat from India in 1947 , “I don’t know how Mr Attlee suddenly agreed to give India independence,” and he went on to say, “That is a secret that he will disclose in his autobiography. None expected that he would do that,” he added.

In the BBC interview he also affirmed that from his “own analysis” he had come to understand that “two things led the Labour party to take this decision” [to free India].

Ambedkar  explained: “The national army that was raised by Subhas Chandra Bose. The British had been ruling the country in the firm belief that whatever may happen in the country or whatever the politicians do, they will never be able to change the loyalty of soldiers. That was one prop on which they were carrying on the administration. And that was completely dashed to pieces. They found that soldiers could be seduced to form a party — a battalion to blow off the British.”

A year after his interview in October 1956, two months before Ambedkar passed away, the very secret was disclosed by Clement Attlee  in a confidential talk. This talk came out in the open only after two decades.

What Ambedkar had foreseen only became more consolidated from records and data from credible authorities such as Ajit Doval, National Security Advisor and Major General GD Bakshi.

Excerpts of an observation in a secret report (Nov 1945) by Sir Norman Smith, Director, Intelligence Bureau, only reinforces the impact of the INA on British move to transfer power: “The situation in respect of the Indian National Army is one which warrants disquiet. There has seldom been a matter which has attracted so much Indian public interest and, it is safe to say, sympathy… the threat to the security of the Indian Army is one which it would be unwise to ignore.”

In 1976, an interesting observation made by Lt General SK Sinha, former Governor of Jammu & Kashmir and Assam, one of the only three Indian officers posted in the Directorate of Military Operations in New Delhi in 1946, is worth a mention: “There was considerable sympathy for the INA within the Army… It is true that fears of another 1857 had begun to haunt the British in 1946.”

To add to it all British MPs met Atlee in 1946 and warned him that, “There are two alternative ways of meeting this common desire (a) that we should arrange to get out, (b) that we should wait to be driven out. In regard to (b), the loyalty of the Indian Army is open to question; the INA have become national heroes…”

So while it is true that Netaji was sidelined and eventually ousted from the Congress, it cannot be denied that he did erect an army that made the colonialists question their power over India.

Much buzz circulates in the country of his disappearance but little is acknowledged of his crucial role in delivering a powerful blow to the British Raj.

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Indian Cities Mumbai, New Delhi and Bengaluru face Majority of Cyber Attacks

As the digital footprint of India increases through capital intensive projects, hackers are targeting data and large scale disruption like never before

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Cyber Attacks
Smart cities, financial services and transportation sectors lead the rankings in terms of Cyber Attacks. Pixabay

 There has been a 26 per cent increase in Cyber Attacks in India and Mumbai, New Delhi and Bengaluru together accounted for roughly 38 per cent of all attacks in the July-September period, a new report said on Wednesday.

The report prepared by Bengaluru-headquartered telecom solutions provider Subex identified over 3,500 modular malware samples in the country, registering a whopping 37 per cent increase.

Smart cities, financial services and transportation sectors lead the rankings in terms of cyber attacks, said the “State of Internet of Things (IoT) Security Report” for the third quarter (July-September period).

“As the digital footprint of India increases through capital intensive projects, hackers are targeting data and large scale disruption like never before,” said said Vinod Kumar, Managing Director and CEO, Subex.

“The increase in cyber attacks against the country and the strong geopolitical correlation indicate high levels of interest in targeting our critical infrastructure. Hackers are working to improve their ability to monetize cyber attacks,” he warned.

Malware of varying degrees of sophistication are being reported from a variety of deployments, including new projects surrounding renewable energy.

Most malware detected (36 per cent) could be traced to sources on the Dark Web while as much as 14 per cent of malware couldn’t be traced to a known source pointing to the arrival of new actors and malware shops on the scene,” the findings showed.

Cyber Attacks
There has been a 26 per cent increase in Cyber Attacks in India and Mumbai, New Delhi and Bengaluru together accounted for roughly 38 per cent of all attacks in the July-September period. Pixabay

The detection of malware connected with critical infrastructure projects has also registered an increase.

“This implies that hackers are targeting large scale disruption and are working to increase the cost associated with managing such projects as also negatively impact future investments in them,” the report added.

ALSO READ: Things You Need to Consider before Filling a Lawsuit

Independent hackers are increasingly feeling the need to monetize cyber attacks as the unit cost of malware has risen in the last quarter. Further, it is becoming increasingly difficult to source high-grade malware from multiple sources due to various factors, the report added. (IANS)