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New method to help decode rare fragile manuscripts

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London: Norwegian researchers are developing new high-tech tools to unlock the secrets hidden in fragile pieces of parchment that are difficult to study because of their age, rarity and susceptibility to contamination. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s Gunnerus Library are using a novel technique called hyperspectral imaging to determine the chemical composition of the pigments used in ancient manuscripts.

“The technique is quite effective for examining old manuscripts and yields much better results than other methods,” said Emilio Catelli, PhD candidate at the department of chemistry, in a statement. “Whole pages can be scanned and analysed in a matter of minutes with this technology. Fragile documents are also protected from marks and rough handling,” Catelli added.

ancient Indus civilisation manuscript
ancient Indus civilisation manuscript

Ancient documents are very sensitive and fragile and should ideally not be touched or exposed to light. “Throughout history, many methods have been used that cause irreparable damage to manuscripts,” noted Victoria Juhlin, conservator at the library.

Hyperspectral imaging uses a hyperspectral camera to scan the document. Advanced cameras can differentiate between 160 colours and have 1,600 pixel sensors. These cameras are good for studying art at a macro level, where details and colour pigments that were previously impossible to see are now made visible because of the high spectral resolution.

“Hyperspectral imaging turns out to be very useful for studying art. The method is also used in medical diagnostics, food science, archaeology and environmental observation,” study co-author Lyngsnes Randeberg said.

(IANS)

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High-Risk Pregnancies Can Now Be Easily Spotted With Samsung’s New Ultrasound System

HERA is a new platform which stands for Hyper-aperture Enhanced Reconstruction Architecture, incorporating Samsung's new Crystal Architecture.

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Samsung, galaxy, Ultrasound system
Samsung planning to develop AI-powered multi-device system. Flickr

Samsung Medison, a global medical equipment company and an affiliate of Samsung Electronics, on Sunday unveiled a new ultrasound system which is expected to facilitate the examination of high-risk pregnancies and early diagnosis of abnormal foetus conditions.

The new ultrasound system provides an 11-fold increase in processing power and 10 times the data transfer speed of the company’s previous system, Samsung said.

The company unveiled the new generation of premium ultrasound system HERA W10 and prototype of a chair-type ultrasound system HERA I10 at the 28th World Congress of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISUOG) held here from October 21-24.

Ultrasound Images, Ultrasound System
Ultrasound Images, Pixabay

“Samsung is proud to introduce a new premium ultrasound system HERA W10 and a form factor innovation ultrasound HERA I10, as well as solutions that greatly improve the efficiency of hospitals,” said Dongsoo Jun, President of Health and Medical Equipment Business at Samsung Electronics and CEO of Samsung Medison.

Also Read: Samsung Launches Galaxy S4 Tab

HERA is a new platform which stands for Hyper-aperture Enhanced Reconstruction Architecture, incorporating Samsung’s new Crystal Architecture to provide advanced technology and capabilities with a new level of image quality.

The new platform combines Crystal Architecture with an advanced transducer technology called S-Vue. (IANS)

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