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Nikki Haley says North Korea Could Face Stronger Sanctions due to its 7th Missile test in 2017

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un , VOA
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US, May 15, 2017: Nikki Haley said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” that North Korea could face stronger sanctions and other measures after the reclusive country conducted its seventh missile test this year, the first since South Korea elected a new president.

North Korea’s new strategic ballistic missile, called Hwasong-12, was fired on Sunday and flew 489 miles on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 1,312 miles, North Korean official news agency KCNA said, according to Reuters.

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The missile blast comes less than a week after new South Korean President Moon Jae-in took office.

“Well, I think you first have to get into Kim Jong-un’s head, you know, which is he’s in a state of paranoia,” Haley, the United States’ ambassador to the United Nations, said on “This Week,” about the North Korean leader. “He’s incredibly concerned about anything and everything around him. I think this was a message to South Korea after the election.

“And so what we’re going to do is continue to tighten the screws. He feels it. He absolutely feels it. And we’re going to continue, whether it’s sanctions, whether it’s press statements, anything that we have to do,” she continued.

While Moon did not back off of possible talks with North Korea, he added that he was not pleased with the missile launch, according to The Korea Herald.

“The possibility of dialogue is open, but provocations must be met with stern responses to prevent North Korea from making misjudgments,” Moon said at a National Security Council meeting, according to The Korea Herald. “(Seoul) must show that dialogue is possible only when North Korea changes its behavior.”

Haley said Sunday that cooperation with China has been better “than we ever have,” and she expects it will produce dividends for the U.S.

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“We are determined to take care of South Korea, which is why we have our mission there, working and that, as well,” Haley said on “This Week.” “And then we’re going to continue to take care of Japan.

“What we do know is the international community is concern. It’s not just us against them anymore. Now you’re going to see the entire international community isolate North Korea and let them know that this is not acceptable,” Haley continued.

Haley said while President Donald Trump is still open to talk with Kim, “Having a missile test is not the way to sit down with the president, because he’s absolutely not going to do it.”

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Face Mask of Kim Jong-un Stirs Controversy

Kim has led North Korea since the death of its former dictator, his father Kim Jong-il, in 2011

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Kim Jong-un
Kim Jong-un face mask stirs controversy.

A South Korean fashion and cosmetics firm has stirred controversy with a facial mask featuring Kim Jong-un prompting many stores to pull the product of the shelves.

The so-called “nuke masks” were created by 5149, a South Korean fashion and cosmetics company. It said it has sold more than 25,000 “unification moisture nuclear masks” since June, the BBC reported.

Many South Korean stores, though, halted the sales amid a public backlash and concerns over the masks’ legality.

In South Korea it is illegal to speak favourably of the North Korean government, though the law is rarely enforced.

Dozens of Koreans have posted pictures of themselves on social media with the masks, which cost 4,000 won, the BBC said.

Propaganda-style slogans claim the masks contain mineral water from Mount Paektu, the sacred, active volcano, which is the birthplace of Dangun, founder of the first Korean kingdom more than 4,000 years ago, according to Korean mythology.

“Personally, I don’t like merchandise promoting a certain political agenda,” Irene Kim, a South Korean skincare expert, told the South China Morning Post.

“A few years ago, North Korea was the largest threat to our country… Kim Jong-un was seen as a dictator and a tyrant who would stop at nothing to disrupt world peace, now he’s become the face of a popular face mask,” she added.

Kim Jong Un
Kim Jong Un.

The North Korean leader and his regime have been criticised by the UN for “systematic, widespread” human rights abuses.

Both North and South Korea are still technically at war, but leaders from both countries attended talks this year over denuclearisation.

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In an interview with the New York Times, 5149 CEO Kwak Hyeon-ju said she wanted the masks to celebrate the “once in a lifetime” Korean summits held earlier this year.

Kim has led North Korea since the death of its former dictator, his father Kim Jong-il, in 2011.

The country’s communist regime has been criticised by the UN and human rights groups for “systematic, widespread and gross human rights violations”. (IANS)