Friday February 23, 2018
Home Politics Nikki Haley s...

Nikki Haley says North Korea Could Face Stronger Sanctions due to its 7th Missile test in 2017

0
//
60
nuclear weapons
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un , VOA
Republish
Reprint

US, May 15, 2017: Nikki Haley said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” that North Korea could face stronger sanctions and other measures after the reclusive country conducted its seventh missile test this year, the first since South Korea elected a new president.

North Korea’s new strategic ballistic missile, called Hwasong-12, was fired on Sunday and flew 489 miles on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 1,312 miles, North Korean official news agency KCNA said, according to Reuters.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The missile blast comes less than a week after new South Korean President Moon Jae-in took office.

“Well, I think you first have to get into Kim Jong-un’s head, you know, which is he’s in a state of paranoia,” Haley, the United States’ ambassador to the United Nations, said on “This Week,” about the North Korean leader. “He’s incredibly concerned about anything and everything around him. I think this was a message to South Korea after the election.

“And so what we’re going to do is continue to tighten the screws. He feels it. He absolutely feels it. And we’re going to continue, whether it’s sanctions, whether it’s press statements, anything that we have to do,” she continued.

While Moon did not back off of possible talks with North Korea, he added that he was not pleased with the missile launch, according to The Korea Herald.

“The possibility of dialogue is open, but provocations must be met with stern responses to prevent North Korea from making misjudgments,” Moon said at a National Security Council meeting, according to The Korea Herald. “(Seoul) must show that dialogue is possible only when North Korea changes its behavior.”

Haley said Sunday that cooperation with China has been better “than we ever have,” and she expects it will produce dividends for the U.S.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“We are determined to take care of South Korea, which is why we have our mission there, working and that, as well,” Haley said on “This Week.” “And then we’re going to continue to take care of Japan.

“What we do know is the international community is concern. It’s not just us against them anymore. Now you’re going to see the entire international community isolate North Korea and let them know that this is not acceptable,” Haley continued.

Haley said while President Donald Trump is still open to talk with Kim, “Having a missile test is not the way to sit down with the president, because he’s absolutely not going to do it.”

NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 
Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Cybercrimes cost businesses $600 billion globally: McAfee report

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted.

0
//
9
Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.
Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage. Wikimedia Commons

Cybercrimes have cost businesses close to $600 billion globally — or 0.8% the global GDP — which is up from $445 billion reported three years back, a report said on Thursday.

The report by the global cybersecurity firm McAfee, prepared along with the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), said that over the last three years, cybercriminals have quickly adopted new technologies to ease the process of engaging in cybercrimes.

“Ransomware-as-a-Service Cloud providers efficiently scale attacks to target millions of systems, and attacks are automated to require minimal human involvement,” Steve Grobman, Chief Technology Officer for McAfee, said in a statement.

Also Read: Indian companies more prone to cyber attacks

“Add to these factors cryptocurrencies that ease rapid monetisation, while minimising the risk of arrest, and you must conclude that the $600 billion cybercrime figure reflects the extent to which our technological accomplishments have transformed the criminal economy as dramatically as they have every other portion of our economy,” he added.
The report, titled “Economic Impact of Cybercrime — No Slowing Down”, said that banks remain the favourite target for cybercriminals.

McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company.
McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company. Wikimedia Commons

Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.

“Our research bore out the fact that Russia is the leader in cybercrime, reflecting the skill of its hacker community and its disdain for Western law enforcement,” said James Lewis, Senior Vice President at CSIS.

“North Korea is second in line, as the nation uses cryptocurrency theft to help fund its regime, and we’re now seeing an expanding number of cybercrime centres, including not only North Korea but also Brazil, India and Vietnam,” Lewis added.

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted. (IANS)