Tuesday November 12, 2019
Home World Official Says...

Official Says 80 Percent of Livestock Dead in Somaliland

80 percent of the region's livestock have died due the drought that has also killed dozens of people and forced thousands into displaced persons camps80 percent of the region's livestock have died due the drought that has also killed dozens of people and forced thousands into displaced persons camps

0
//
Livestock
Man looks at carcass of his goats which died due to the severe drought in the Togdher region of Somaliland, VOA

Las-anod, March 25: Authorities in the breakaway republic of Somaliland say at least 80 percent of the region’s livestock have died due to the crippling drought that has also killed dozens of people and forced thousands into displaced persons camps.

“The situation is very grave as most of the livestock were killed by drought,” said Mohamud Ali Saleban, governor of the Togdheer region, in the town of Buro.

“We are waiting for the rain, but if it does not come in the next few days, we expect the government to declare an emergency,” the governor told VOA.

Officials told VOA that nearly 50 people across Somaliland have died due to drought-related illnesses.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Nomadic communities all across this region said they have never experienced this kind of drought.

Jama Handulle Yassin, a 63-year-old herder, said he has lost more than 280 goats, leaving him with just 30.

“The starvation affected everything, and the situation now is very dangerous where we run for our lives before we die here,” he said. “We appeal to the world to immediately support us.”

Another woman, age 73, said, “This is the worst I have seen in my life.”

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Somaliland was affected by the 2011 regional drought that killed an estimated 260,000 people, but that event had its gravest impact in south and central Somalia.

Somaliland declared independence from Somalia in 1991 but is not recognized by any other country.

The current drought has forced tens of thousands of pastoralists to flee from remote villages into towns, where they set up makeshift camps.

As water becomes scarce, the drought is forcing many people living in camps outside the town of Las-Anod to drink dirty water.

Standing near the carcass of a camel, Roble Jama, a 13-year-old herder, said his family lost the only camel they had due to drought.

“I have seen when the camel was dying and I felt so sad. The camel’s name was Cadaawe and was nine years old,” Roble Jama told VOA near the village of Ina-Afmadobe.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The United Nations recently warned that 6.2 million people across Somalia are facing acute food shortages. More than 1.5 million of those live in Somaliland.

(VOA)

Next Story

World Leaders Gathering in New York for United Nations Summit on Climate Change

U.S. President Donald Trump will not be among those attending the summit

0
World, Leaders, New York, United Nations
In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani reviews an honor guard at the Mehrabad airport while leaving Tehran, Iran, for New York to attend UN General Assembly, Monday, Sept. 23, 2019. VOA

World leaders are gathering Monday in New York for a United Nations summit on climate change as scientists warn much more ambitious action must be taken to meet targets to mitigate the effects.

Some 60 presidents and prime ministers are due to address the day-long event on topics including shifting away from coal toward renewable energy sources, preventing and responding to disasters, and climate finance.

U.S. President Donald Trump will not be among those attending the summit.  He is spending Monday attending a meeting about the persecution of religious minorities, particularly Christians, before holding separate talks with leaders from Pakistan, Poland, New Zealand, Singapore, Egypt and South Korea.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has sought to highlight the importance of the climate summit and challenged leaders to “come with concrete plans” and not just “beautiful speeches.”

World, Leaders, New York, United Nations
Some 60 presidents and prime ministers are due to address the day-long event on topics including shifting away from coal toward renewable energy sources. Pixabay

Ahead of Monday’s event, the U.N. released a report compiled by the World Meteorological Organization showing there has been an acceleration in carbon pollution, sea-level rise, warming global temperatures, and shrinking ice sheets.

The report says the average global temperature for the period of 2015 through the end of 2019 is on pace to be the “warmest of any equivalent period on record” at 1.1 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, which has been ratified by 186 nations, calls for actions to prevent global temperatures from surpassing 2 degrees, and ideally remain within 1.5 degrees by cutting greenhouse gas emissions.  One of the world’s biggest emitters – the United States – announced under President Trump that it would leave the pact. The U.S. decision has not stopped climate action at the state, local and private sector levels.

The report warns that in order to achieve the 2 degree target, “the level of ambition needs to be tripled.”

Also Read- Malawi Trying to Find Ways to Contain Overfishing in Its Largest Body of Water, Lake Malawi

Other global issues such as tensions between the United States and Iran; conflicts in Afghanistan, Yemen, Syria, and Kashmir; rising in equality and intolerance all figure to be themes as the U.N. General Assembly session begins Tuesday. (VOA)