Wednesday March 21, 2018

One-third of young Women with Diabetes likely to have Eating Disorder: Study

Diabetes, Pixabay

London, Feb 5, 2017: As many as one-third of young women with diabetes could be suffering with a type of eating disorder that prompts them to manipulate or omit insulin intake leading to severe complications such as heart disease, nerve damage and amputation as well as vision problems, researchers say.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which people with Type 1 diabetes deliberately give themselves less insulin than they need, for the purpose of weight loss.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“People with diabetes are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. As 15 to 20 percent of all young women have an eating disorder and the risk is twice as high in people with Type 1 diabetes… this means that up to a third of young women with diabetes develop eating disorder,” Janet Treasure, Professor at Kings College London, was quoted as saying to

“Diabulimia is a serious condition that often gets overlooked…for people with Type 1 diabetes, the stress of injecting (insulin) can have a detrimental effect,” said Charlotte Summers from — a British-based support community for people with diabetes.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The signs of diabulimia may include regular changes in weight, awkwardness over questions about diabetes control, avoiding clinic appointments, having a high haemoglobin A1c(HbA1c) compared with results entered in a blood glucose diary, being very thirsty, needing to urinate frequently and having blurred vision.

In addition, manipulating or omitting insulin can also cause blood sugar levels to surge and reach an unhealthy level. This may lead to simple fatigue to wearing of the muscle tissue and can cause complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease, the researchers said.

“It is something that affects both men and women and requires more awareness and research in order to determine the best way to address the emotional impact of diabetes,” Summers noted. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Poor dental health linked to diabetes risk

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant

Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
  • Poor dental health may lead to Diabetes
  • A dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk of diabetes
  • It is all connected to the glucose tolerance of a person

You may be at an increased risk of diabetes if you are not taking care of your dental health, warns a new study which suggests that dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk for developing the disease.

“We found a progressive positive relationship between worsening glucose tolerance and the number of missing teeth,” said lead author Raynald Samoa from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Teeth sensitivity may cause severe pain, therefore treating it as early as possible is a must
Poor dental health can increase the risk of diabetes. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, presented at the ENDO 2018: The Endocrine Society’s 100th Annual Meeting and Expo, researchers reviewed the records of 9,670 adults with 20 years of age and above who were examined by dentists during the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

They analysed their reported body mass index (BMI) and glucose tolerance states by fasting plasma glucose, two-hour post-challenge plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), established diabetes and whether the condition was treated with oral agents or insulin.

Also Read: Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

The researchers recorded the numbers of missing teeth due to caries, or cavities, and periodontal disease for individual patients. They also determined the relationship between glucose tolerance and dental condition by considering age, gender, racial and ethnic group, family history of diabetes, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education and poverty index.

The researchers found a progressive increase in the number of patients with missing teeth as glucose tolerance declined, from 45.57 per cent in the group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), to 67.61 per cent in the group with abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT), to 82.87 per cent in the group with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Type 1 Diabetes
The risk of diabetes is connected to dental health via glucose tolerance.

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant: 2.26 in the NGT group, 4.41 in the AGT group and 6.80 in those with DM, the researchers noted. IANS

Next Story