Tuesday November 12, 2019

One-third of young Women with Diabetes likely to have Eating Disorder: Study

0
//
Diabetes, Pixabay

London, Feb 5, 2017: As many as one-third of young women with diabetes could be suffering with a type of eating disorder that prompts them to manipulate or omit insulin intake leading to severe complications such as heart disease, nerve damage and amputation as well as vision problems, researchers say.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which people with Type 1 diabetes deliberately give themselves less insulin than they need, for the purpose of weight loss.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“People with diabetes are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. As 15 to 20 percent of all young women have an eating disorder and the risk is twice as high in people with Type 1 diabetes… this means that up to a third of young women with diabetes develop eating disorder,” Janet Treasure, Professor at Kings College London, was quoted as saying to express.co.uk.

“Diabulimia is a serious condition that often gets overlooked…for people with Type 1 diabetes, the stress of injecting (insulin) can have a detrimental effect,” said Charlotte Summers from Diabetes.co.uk — a British-based support community for people with diabetes.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The signs of diabulimia may include regular changes in weight, awkwardness over questions about diabetes control, avoiding clinic appointments, having a high haemoglobin A1c(HbA1c) compared with results entered in a blood glucose diary, being very thirsty, needing to urinate frequently and having blurred vision.

In addition, manipulating or omitting insulin can also cause blood sugar levels to surge and reach an unhealthy level. This may lead to simple fatigue to wearing of the muscle tissue and can cause complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease, the researchers said.

“It is something that affects both men and women and requires more awareness and research in order to determine the best way to address the emotional impact of diabetes,” Summers noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Successful Bariatric Surgery Among Older Adults: Study

Weight loss surgeries are proven to be successful for older adults

0
older adults
Study indicates that older adults treated with bariatric surgery can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications. Pixabay

Weight-loss or bariatric surgeries are not usually performed in people above the age of 65. But researchers, including Indian-origin, have now found that these procedures could lead to successful weight loss and better diabetes control in older adults.

The study, presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton, UK, indicates that elderly patients treated with bariatric surgery (gastric bypass or gastric sleeve) can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications, including heart disease and diabetes.

“Although based on a small number of patients, our data suggest that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older patients, which could have real benefits for their longevity and quality of life,” said study researcher Nader Lessan from the Abu Dhabi-based Imperial College London Diabetes Centre.

Lessan and the study’s co-author Saradalekshmi Radha assessed the results of 22 patients who had attended their medical centre and who had undergone weight loss surgery after the age of 65.

Two years after weight-loss surgery, the patients had, on an average, lost 24 per cent of their original body weight.

Older adults
Data suggests that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older adults. Pixabay

In addition, of the 11 patients who had been on insulin to control their type 2 diabetes, four no longer needed it, while for others, the total insulin dose required had significantly decreased.

The only adverse effects reported during the two year period were iron and vitamin D deficiencies, which happen in younger patients too.

Also read- Bariatric Surgery Leads To Nutritional Deficiency

“Management of obesity and diabetes in old age is challenging. There is a lot of scepticism around conducting weight-loss surgery in patients over 65,” Lessan said.

“Our study suggests these procedures could be considered in older adults as an effective intervention to aid weight loss and associated complications.” (IANS)