Wednesday October 24, 2018

One-third of young Women with Diabetes likely to have Eating Disorder: Study

0
//
122
Diabetes, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

London, Feb 5, 2017: As many as one-third of young women with diabetes could be suffering with a type of eating disorder that prompts them to manipulate or omit insulin intake leading to severe complications such as heart disease, nerve damage and amputation as well as vision problems, researchers say.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which people with Type 1 diabetes deliberately give themselves less insulin than they need, for the purpose of weight loss.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“People with diabetes are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. As 15 to 20 percent of all young women have an eating disorder and the risk is twice as high in people with Type 1 diabetes… this means that up to a third of young women with diabetes develop eating disorder,” Janet Treasure, Professor at Kings College London, was quoted as saying to express.co.uk.

“Diabulimia is a serious condition that often gets overlooked…for people with Type 1 diabetes, the stress of injecting (insulin) can have a detrimental effect,” said Charlotte Summers from Diabetes.co.uk — a British-based support community for people with diabetes.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The signs of diabulimia may include regular changes in weight, awkwardness over questions about diabetes control, avoiding clinic appointments, having a high haemoglobin A1c(HbA1c) compared with results entered in a blood glucose diary, being very thirsty, needing to urinate frequently and having blurred vision.

In addition, manipulating or omitting insulin can also cause blood sugar levels to surge and reach an unhealthy level. This may lead to simple fatigue to wearing of the muscle tissue and can cause complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease, the researchers said.

“It is something that affects both men and women and requires more awareness and research in order to determine the best way to address the emotional impact of diabetes,” Summers noted. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Family Size Can Be Determined By Reproductive Rights: Study

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care

0
Reproductive Rights, abortion
A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.

The U.N. report says people in developed countries tend to have lower fertility rates because of greater access to family planning services, modern contraceptives and age-appropriate sex education.

The director of the U.N. Population Fund office in Geneva, Monica Ferro, says in places where reproductive rights are constrained, either due to lack of resources or government mandates, people have a limited ability to choose the size of their families.

reproductive rights
Google suspends Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Ads, VOA

“Many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, have fertility rates of four or more births per woman,” Ferro said. “At the other end of the spectrum, you have some eastern Asian and European countries with fewer than two births per women. In both cases, individuals face obstacles to the full realization of their reproductive rights.”

The world population is expected to increase by 2.5 billion by 2050, to nearly 10 billion people, with sub-Saharan Africa expected to contribute more than half of that growth.

Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility, Ferro said.

reproductive rights
Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility.

“Women may not have the access to medical services,” she told VOA. “They may not have the access to child care. They may not have access to all the institutional and social support that comes with being ready or being able to plan your fertility.”

Also Read: Brisbane, Australia Protests Against Plans To Decriminalise Abortion

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care, including modern contraceptives and better education.

It also advocates for a change in men’s attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose the number, timing and spacing of children. (VOA)