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Oracle Launches Intelligence Map for Close Look at Internet

Oracle unveils Internet Intelligence Map

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Oracle Launches Intelligence Map for Close Look at Internet.
Witnessing double-digit growth in India for past 3 years: Oracle. IANS

Cloud major Oracle has announced availability of an Internet Intelligence Map that will provide users with a simple, graphical way to track Internet’s health and gain insight into events such as natural disasters or state-imposed interruptions.

The map is part of Oracle’s Internet Intelligence initiative which provides insight and analysis on the state of global internet infrastructure, the company said in a statement.

“The Internet is the world’s most important network, yet it is incredibly volatile. Disruptions on the Internet can affect companies, governments and network operators in profound ways,” said Kyle York, Vice President of product strategy for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

Also Read: Facebook May Unveil Eye-Tracking Technology in Future

“With this offering, we are delivering on our commitment to making it a better, more stable experience for all who rely on it,” added York, also General Manager for Oracle’s Dyn Global Business Unit.

The Internet Intelligence Map presents country-level connectivity statistics based on traceroutes, BGP, and DNS query volumes on a single dashboard.

By presenting these three dimensions of Internet connectivity side-by-side, users can investigate the impact of an issue on Internet connectivity worldwide. (IANS)

Next Story

Russian Lawmakers Come Up In Support For Bill on ‘Sovereign’ Internet

The bill faces two more votes in the lower chamber, before it is voted on in the upper house of parliament and then signed into law by President Vladimir Putin.

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The coat of arms of Russia is reflected in a laptop screen in this picture illustration taken Feb. 12, 2019. Pixabay

Russian lawmakers backed tighter internet controls on Tuesday to defend against foreign meddling in draft legislation that critics warn could disrupt Russia’s internet and be used to stifle dissent.

The legislation, which some Russian media have likened to an online “iron curtain,” passed its first of three readings in the 450-seat lower chamber of parliament.

The bill seeks to route Russian web traffic and data through points controlled by state authorities and proposes building a national Domain Name System to allow the internet to continue functioning even if the country is cut off from foreign infrastructure.

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The legislation, which some Russian media have likened to an online “iron curtain,” passed its first of three readings in the 450-seat lower chamber of parliament. Pixabay

The legislation was drafted in response to what its authors describe as an aggressive new U.S. national cybersecurity strategy passed last year.

The Agora human rights group said earlier this month that the legislation was one of several new bills drafted in December that “seriously threaten Internet freedom.”

The Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs has said the bill poses more of a risk to the functioning of the Russian internet segment than the alleged threats from foreign countries that the bill seeks to counter.

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The Agora human rights group said earlier this month that the legislation was one of several new bills drafted in December that “seriously threaten Internet freedom.” Pixabay

The bill also proposes installing network equipment that would be able to identify the source of web traffic and also block banned content.

The legislation, which can still be amended, but which is expected to pass, is part of a drive by officials to increase Russian “sovereignty” over its internet segment.

Also Read: Now Russian Telecom Watchdog To Direct Facebook, Twitter to Localise Users’ Database

Russia has introduced tougher internet laws in the last five years, requiring search engines to delete some search results, messaging services to share encryption keys with security services, and social networks to store Russian users’ personal data on servers within the country.

The bill faces two more votes in the lower chamber, before it is voted on in the upper house of parliament and then signed into law by President Vladimir Putin.(VOA)