Thursday March 21, 2019
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Over 48,000 Indians acquired EU citizenship in 2013

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Brussels: In 2013, round 985,000 people acquired citizenship of a European Union (EU) member-state, among them 48,300 Indians, three-quarters of whom acquired British citizenship.

The EU’s statistical office, Eurostat, on Wednesday said that of the total number of people obtaining the citizenship of one of the 28 EU member-states in 2013, 89 percent were citizens of non-EU countries.

The largest groups acquiring citizenship of an EU member-state in 2013 were citizens of Morocco (86,500 people, of whom 84 percent acquired citizenship of Spain, Italy or France), followed by Turkey (46,500, 60 percent acquired German citizenship), Colombia (42,000, 93 percent acquired Spanish citizenship), Albania (41,700, 95 percent acquired citizenship of Greece or Italy) and Ecuador (40,400, 95 percent acquired Spanish citizenship).

Moroccans, Indians, Turks, Colombians, Albanians and Ecuadorians represented together almost a third (31 percent) of the total number of people who acquired EU citizenship in 2013, it noted.

(IANS)

 

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British Parliament To Vote On Withdrawal Agreement Negotiated With The EU

Some lawmakers have proposed holding a second referendum like the one in 2016 that set Britain on the path toward leaving the EU.

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Anti-Brexit supporters hold European Union flags as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament on Jan. 14, 2019. VOA

Britain’s parliament votes Tuesday on the withdrawal agreement that Prime Minister Theresa May’s government negotiated with the European Union.

May canceled a previous vote in December when it was clear she did not have enough votes for the deal to pass, and since then little seems to have changed.

Both pro- and anti-Brexit lawmakers oppose the terms of the agreement. May sought to garner last-minute support Monday by asking them to examine it again while warning of the consequences if the deal fails.

The biggest point of contention has been the arrangement to have an open border between Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland that would keep Britain in some way tied to EU trade policies until the two sides can negotiate a new trade deal.

In a Tuesday radio interview International Trade Secretary Liam Fox said it was not acceptable for the unelected House of Lords to try to block the democratic will of the British people, who voted by a 52-48 margin in June, 2016 to leave the EU.
The Independent newspaper Tuesday night reported that May was preparing for a Brexit meeting with select cabinet ministers Wednesday at which they will try to come up with a joint position on post-withdrawal customs relations following rejection of Britain’s existing proposals. wikimedia commons

EU leaders said Monday the so-called “backstop” arrangement would only be in place as long as necessary.

Negotiators from Britain and the European Union agreed to the terms of the Brexit deal in November after difficult talks, and if the British parliament votes against the agreement there is great uncertainty about what will happen next.

Also Read: Brexit Consequences Getting Tougher for Theresa May

May would have until next Monday to put forth a new proposal. There is also the chance Britain could reach its March 29 withdrawal deadline with no terms in place to specify just how it will relate to the European Union when it is no longer a member.

Some lawmakers have proposed holding a second referendum like the one in 2016 that set Britain on the path toward leaving the EU. Others want parliament to take control of the Brexit process from May and her Cabinet. (VOA)