Monday January 21, 2019
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Paris Agreement In Full Swing, Developed Countries Urged To Honor It

More than 1,400 delegates from 182 countries are participating in the Bangkok Climate Change Conference from Tuesday to Sunday.

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Developed countries are being urged to honour Paris Agreement. Flickr

A joint platform of developing countries on Saturday called on the developed nations to make a greater commitment towards honouring the Paris Agreement during the Climate Change Conference being held in the Thai capital.

The platform, which brings together around 20 countries including Bolivia, Ecuador, Cuba and Venezuela, called for respecting the vital and delicate balance reached in 2015 in Paris, Efe news reported.

Iran’s Majib Shafiepour, a spokesperson for the coalition, expressed disappointment over the position taken by developed nations and their alleged unwillingness to make progress on key issues like the funding required to combat climate change pledged under the Paris Agreement.

 Paris Agreement
India Prime Minister Narendra Modi delivers a speech as he attends Heads of States’ Statements ceremony of the COP21 World Climate Change Conference 2015 in Le Bourget, north of Paris, France, 30 November 2015.

As agreed in the landmark 2015 conference, developed countries have to contribute $100 billion annually starting in 2020 to be given to the most disadvantaged nations to fight against climate change and alleviate its effects.

Ecuador’s Walter Schuldt blamed the change in the financial narrative provided by the bloc of developed nations for the delay in the realization of measures.

Part of the funds will be used to alleviate and mitigate the damage and consequences of environmental disasters and to finance adaptation to technological change in developing nations.

“There is a lack of progress and interest on the part of developed countries,” said Bolivia’s Ivan Zambrana. “This indifference creates new obstacles.”

Although no specific developed countries were mentioned by name during the media appearance, a source participating in the meetings told Efe news that the US was the main country hindering the dialogue process.

Paris Agreement
Education – along with training and public awareness – plays a key role in the global response to climate change, as recognized by Article 6 of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Article 12 of the Paris Agreement. Flickr

Although US President Donald Trump announced in June 2017 the withdrawal of his country from the Paris Agreement, the move will not be effective until November 2020.

Also Read: Asia’s Increase In Consumption of Meat to Cause Environmental Problems: Researchers

More than 1,400 delegates from 182 countries are participating in the Bangkok Climate Change Conference from Tuesday to Sunday, the last preparatory meeting before the Climate Summit set to be held in Katowice, Poland in December.

Delegates in Bangkok were also negotiating on a handbook of standards and guidelines that included goals, schedules and policies for countries to reduce their emissions of polluting gases responsible for global warming, in accordance with the Paris Agreement. (IANS)

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New Technology That Can Clean Water Twice As of Now

more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world's population will be living in water-stressed areas.

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water
Novel technology cleans water using bacteria

Researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have developed a new technology that can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes, an advance that brings hope for countries like India where clean drinking water is a big issue.

According to a team from the Washington University in St. Louis, more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas.

The team led by Srikanth Singamaneni, Professor at the varsity, developed an ultrafiltration membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose that they found to be highly efficient, long-lasting and environment-friendly.

The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling, or build up of bacteria and other harmful micro-organisms that reduce the flow of water.

Water
The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling. VOA

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, they used bacteria to build such filtering membranes.

The Gluconacetobacter hansenii bacteria is a sugary substance that forms cellulose nanofibres when in water.

The team then incorporated graphene oxide (GO) flakes into the bacterial nanocellulose while it was growing, essentially trapping GO in the membrane to make it stable and durable.

They exposed the membrane to E. coli bacteria, then shone light on the membrane’s surface.

After being irradiated with light for just three minutes, the E. coli bacteria died. The team determined that the membrane quickly heated to above the 70 degrees Celsius required to deteriorate the cell walls of E. coli bacteria.

While the bacteria are killed, the researchers had a pristine membrane with a high quality of nanocellulose fibres that was able to filter water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes under a high operating pressure.

When they did the same experiment on a membrane made from bacterial nanocellulose without the reduced GO, the E. coli bacteria stayed alive.

The new technology is capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, as a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates. Pixabay

While the researchers acknowledge that implementing this process in conventional reverse osmosis systems is taxing, they propose a spiral-wound module system, similar to a roll of towels.
Also Read: India Gets Assistance of Rs 3,420 Crore From Japan
It could be equipped with LEDs or a type of nanogenerator that harnesses mechanical energy from the fluid flow to produce light and heat, which would reduce the overall cost.

If the technique were to be scaled up to a large size, it could benefit many developing countries where clean water is scarce, the researchers noted. (IANS)