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Peshawar High Court moves against ongoing Demolition of Hindu Temple in Pakistan

An ancient Hindu temple, located in Mohallah Wangrhi Garah in Karimpura locality, was being secretly demolished

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Representational image. Flickr

Islamabad, November 8, 2016: Two Pakistanis have moved the Peshawar High Court against the alleged ongoing demolition of a non-functional Hindu temple in Peshawar.

They have sought orders for placing the old structure under the control of the archaeology department, the Dawn reported on Tuesday.

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Muhibur Rehman and Waqif Saleem said the issue of alleged changes made to the temple building was reported in national and international newspapers, following which the government sealed the temple and arrested two tenants.

They added that those elements in connivance with the evacuee trust properties department had resumed the temple’s demolition to construct a plaza there.

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The petition, filed through lawyer Muazzam Butt, lists as respondents a string of officials including the provincial Home Secretary, the archaeology director, Peshawar Deputy Commissioner and the local police.

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The petitioners quoted media reports to say that the ancient Hindu temple, located in Mohallah Wangrhi Garah in Karimpura locality, was being secretly demolished.

They added that they had addressed a news conference reminding the government to take appropriate steps to protect the Hindu temples and holy places but to no avail. (IANS)

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Research Says, Hindu Kids are More Likely to Believe that Hinduism Equals to Being Indian

The findings, published in the journal Child Development, also suggest that Muslim children feel no less Indian because of their faith

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If Muslim children were to equate being Indian with being Hindu, they could very well feel conflicted about being Indian or being Muslim. Pixabay

When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country’s Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our results indicate that by age 9, Hindu children have already internalised an ‘Indian equals Hindu’ association, and we show that this association predicts children’s support for policies that favor Hindus over Muslims,” said study senior author Mahesh Srinivasan, Associate Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley.

The findings, published in the journal Child Development, also suggest that Muslim children feel no less Indian because of their faith, indicating they are shielded from religious nationalist messaging and able to identify both as Indian and as Muslim, added Srinivasan.

“If Muslim children were to equate being Indian with being Hindu, they could very well feel conflicted about being Indian or being Muslim. We know from other research that disconnection from one’s own national, ethnic, or religious group is bad for mental health and other life outcomes,” he said.

Through surveys and social psychology measures, the researchers examined the explicit and implicit associations and attitudes of 160 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 16 in Vadodara, Gujarat.

All the children attended Zenith, a charitable school for low-income children in Vadodara.

The children, 79 of whom were Hindu and 81 of whom were Muslim, were each given an implicit association test, which asked them to swiftly pair together words and pictures.

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When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country’s Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. Pixabay

The results showed that Hindu children more readily paired images associated with India with the word “Hindu” and images associated with foreign countries with “Muslim,” suggesting that they think of India as primarily a Hindu nation.

By contrast, Muslim children were just as fast at pairing Indian images with the words “Hindu” or “Muslim.”

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India is home to about 900 million Hindus and 200 million Muslims, as well as Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jews and offshoots of these groups. (IANS)