Thursday February 21, 2019

Pine Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study

Results of the eight week trial showed that those who took the supplement, finished a two mile-run two minutes faster than at the start of the trial

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Pine Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study
Pink Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study. (Bollywood Country)

Struggling to stick with your fitness routine? Research shows that the bark from pine trees could help in keeping you fit.

A scientific study, published in a recent issue of The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, shows that the extract is effective in reducing muscle soreness and cramping and also in improving performance and endurance, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

The study was conducted on 147 recreational athletes. They were divided into two groups – one group supplemented their diet with the pine bark extract, known as Pycnogenol and the other did not.

Fitness (Representational image)
Fitness (Representational image). Pixabay

Results of the eight week trial showed that those who took the supplement, finished a two mile-run two minutes faster than at the start of the trial.

“This study provides evidence that daily supplementation of Pycnogenol offers a natural approach to help reduce post-workout muscular pain, increase levels of physical performance and get you training again sooner,” said Gianni Belcaro, lead researcher of the study.

Also Read: Heart Patients Need to Focus on Fitness And Exercise, Not Weight Loss

“Pycnogenol, along with good training and proper nutrition, may help to significantly improve physical fitness and reduce oxidative stress and muscular pain in both those who exercise recreationally and triathletes,” added Belcaro. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Mystery Solved: Why Do You Feel Sleepy When You Are Sick?

The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.

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The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.
The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found a gene that acts as a direct link between illness and the need for more sleep.

In a study of over 12,000 lines of fruit flies, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in the US found the single gene, called nemuri, that increases the need for sleep.

The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.

“While it’s a common notion that sleep and healing are tightly related, our study directly links sleep to the immune system and provides a potential explanation for how sleep increases during sickness,” said Amita Sehgal, Professor at the varsity.

Without the nemuri gene, flies were more easily aroused during daily sleep, and their acute need for an increase in sleep — induced by sleep deprivation or infection — was reduced.

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Over expression of nemuri increased sleep in bacteria-infected flies and led to their increased survival compared to non-infected control flies. Pixabay

On the other hand, sleep deprivation, which increases the need for sleep, and to some extent infection, stimulated nemuri to be expressed in a small set of fly neurons nestled close to a known sleep-promoting structure in the brain.

Over expression of nemuri increased sleep in bacteria-infected flies and led to their increased survival compared to non-infected control flies.

sleep
Moreover, the researchers, in the study published in the journal Science, noted that an immune cell molecule — interleukin-1 (IL-1) — is implicated in human sleep.  Pixabay

In response to infection, nemuri appears to kill microbes, most likely in the peripheral parts of the fruit fly body, and increases sleep through its action in the brain.

Also Read: Train Your Brain By Following Good Habits Constantly

Moreover, the researchers, in the study published in the journal Science, noted that an immune cell molecule — interleukin-1 (IL-1) — is implicated in human sleep.

IL-1 accumulates after prolonged wakefulness and appears to promote sleep, suggesting that nemuri is a working link between immune function and sleep. (IANS)