Monday April 22, 2019

Pine Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study

Results of the eight week trial showed that those who took the supplement, finished a two mile-run two minutes faster than at the start of the trial

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Pine Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study
Pink Bark Helps in Fitness, Recovery: Study. (Bollywood Country)

Struggling to stick with your fitness routine? Research shows that the bark from pine trees could help in keeping you fit.

A scientific study, published in a recent issue of The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, shows that the extract is effective in reducing muscle soreness and cramping and also in improving performance and endurance, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

The study was conducted on 147 recreational athletes. They were divided into two groups – one group supplemented their diet with the pine bark extract, known as Pycnogenol and the other did not.

Fitness (Representational image)
Fitness (Representational image). Pixabay

Results of the eight week trial showed that those who took the supplement, finished a two mile-run two minutes faster than at the start of the trial.

“This study provides evidence that daily supplementation of Pycnogenol offers a natural approach to help reduce post-workout muscular pain, increase levels of physical performance and get you training again sooner,” said Gianni Belcaro, lead researcher of the study.

Also Read: Heart Patients Need to Focus on Fitness And Exercise, Not Weight Loss

“Pycnogenol, along with good training and proper nutrition, may help to significantly improve physical fitness and reduce oxidative stress and muscular pain in both those who exercise recreationally and triathletes,” added Belcaro. (Bollywood Country)

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Having Healthy Breakfast and Short TV Watching Span Can Lead To A Healthier Heart

Compared to those watching less than seven hours of TV per week, they were also twice as likely to have plaque buildup in the arteries, which is associated with an increased risk of stroke. 

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Similarly, only 18 per cent consuming a high-energy breakfast showed high plaque levels in the carotid arteries, as compared to 28 per cent of people skipping breakfast and 26 per cent of those consuming a low-energy breakfast. Pixabay

Want a healthy heart? Turning off the TV, being active and eating an energy-rich breakfast of milk, cheese and cereals everyday could be the key, suggest researchers in a new study.

The findings of the study showed that people who watched more than 21 hours of TV per week were 68 per cent more likely to have high blood pressure and 50 per cent more likely to have diabetes.

Compared to those watching less than seven hours of TV per week, they were also twice as likely to have plaque buildup in the arteries, which is associated with an increased risk of stroke.

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Instead of being sedentary, performing recreational activities, weight lifting, stretching bands or treadmill exercise while watching TV may also be a healthy alternative, Tsalamandris suggested.
Pixabay

“Our results emphasise the importance of avoiding prolonged periods of sedentary behaviour,” said lead researcher Sotirios Tsalamandris, cardiologist at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece.

“These findings suggest a clear message to hit the ‘off’ button on your TV and abandon your sofa. Even activities of low energy expenditure, such as socialising with friends or housekeeping activities, may have a substantial benefit to your health compared to time spent sitting and watching TV.”

Instead of being sedentary, performing recreational activities, weight lifting, stretching bands or treadmill exercise while watching TV may also be a healthy alternative, Tsalamandris suggested.

Moreover, the researchers found that those who ate a high-energy breakfast tended to have significantly healthier arteries than those who ate little or no breakfast.

Eating high-energy breakfast also reduced arterial stiffness with only 8.7 per cent participants experiencing the condition, as compared to 15 per cent of those skipping breakfast and 9.5 per cent of those consuming a low-energy breakfast.

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Moreover, the researchers found that those who ate a high-energy breakfast tended to have significantly healthier arteries than those who ate little or no breakfast. Pixabay

Also Read: Being Active On Facebook Can Raise Your Political Awareness

Similarly, only 18 per cent consuming a high-energy breakfast showed high plaque levels in the carotid arteries, as compared to 28 per cent of people skipping breakfast and 26 per cent of those consuming a low-energy breakfast.

The study, involving 2,000 people, will be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session in New Orleans, US. (IANS)