Monday May 28, 2018
Home Science & Technology Plants can be...

Plants can be Renewable and Biodegradable alternative to Polymers used in 3-D Printing materials: Research

0
//
99
Plants, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New York, March 5, 2017: Plants could be a renewable and biodegradable alternative to the polymers currently used in 3-D printing materials, researchers have found.

A new paper, published in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, found that cellulose might become an abundant material to print with.

“Cellulose is the most important component in giving wood its mechanical properties. And because it is so inexpensive, it is biorenewable, biodegradable and also very chemically versatile, it is used in a lot of products,” said Sebastian Pattinson, lead author of a paper, from Massachusetts Institute Of Technology (MIT).

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“Cellulose and its derivatives are used in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, as food additives, building materials, clothing — all sorts of different areas. And a lot of these kinds of products would benefit from the kind of customisation that additive manufacturing [3-D printing] enables,” Pattinson added.

When heated, cellulose thermally decomposes before it becomes flowable, partly because of the hydrogen bonds that exist between the cellulose molecules. The intermolecular bonding also makes high-concentration cellulose solutions too viscous to easily extrude.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“We found that the strength and toughness of the parts we got… was greater than many commonly used materials for 3-D printing, including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA),” he said.

Cellulose acetate is already widely available as a commodity product. In bulk, the material is comparable in price to that of thermoplastics used for injection molding and it’s much less expensive than the typical filament materials used for 3-D printing. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Now Vitamin B12 Can be Found in Plants as well

If you are a hardcore vegetarian but deficient in Vitamin B12, then there is a good news for you as scientists have discovered ways to increase the levels of Vitamin B12 in an ayurveda herb used in making soups and sandwiches.

0
//
23
Plant Species (representational Image), Wikimedia

If you are a hardcore vegetarian but deficient in Vitamin B12, then there is a good news for you as scientists have discovered ways to increase the levels of Vitamin B12 in an ayurveda herb used in making soups and sandwiches.

 

This fluorescent was then fed to the garden cress plants which was being cultivated by the students.
Arjuna plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is an essential dietary component found especially in meat, fish and milk products.

 

However, plants do not make this nutrient, making vegetarians prone to Vitamin B12 deficiency.

Researchers, led by Martin Warren from University of Kent, found that the common garden cress, also known as pepper grass, can absorb cobalamin depending upon the amount present in the growth medium. They also confirmed that the nutrient gets stored in the leaves of the plant.

 

This fluorescent was then fed to the garden cress plants which was being cultivated by the students.
Tulsi plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Pixabay

Garden cress, known as “chandrashoor” in India, is considered as an ayurveda herb. It is genetically related to mustard and is used in making soups, sandwiches and salads because of its tangy flavour.

 

In the study, published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology, the team made a type of Vitamin B12 that emits fluorescent light when activated by a laser.

This fluorescent was then fed to the garden cress plants which was being cultivated by the students.

Team Led by Indian-Origin Scientist Converts Plant Matter Into Chemicals
Ashwagandha plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

 

The researchers found that the Vitamin B12 accumulated in a specialised part of the leaf cell called a vacuole, providing definitive evidence that some plants can absorb and transport cobalamin.

“The observation that certain plants are able to absorb Vitamin B12 is important as they could help overcome dietary limitations in countries like India, with a high proportion of vegetarians. It may also be a way to address the global challenge of providing a nutrient-complete vegetarian diet,” the researchers said.

Also Read: Hydroponics: Growing Plants Without Soil!

According to the researchers, the study also has implications for combating some parasitic infections. (IANS)