Monday July 22, 2019

Poor self-regulation among Teens strongly associated with when one Sleeps: Study

Nearly 22 per cent of the students reported sleeping less than seven hours on school nights

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Representational image. Flickr

New York, November 6, 2016: Poor self-regulation among teens is strongly associated with when one sleeps in relation to their body’s natural circadian rhythm, finds a study.

According to the study, published in the journal Pediatrics, daytime sleepiness and being a night owl appear to be more strongly associated with poor self-regulation.

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“The results of this study suggest it is not how long you sleep that has the biggest impact on self-regulation, but when you sleep in relation to the body’s natural circadian rhythms and how impaired you are by sleepiness,” said Judith Owens, Director of the Sleep Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, US.

The researchers analysed 2,017 surveys completed by 7th to 12th graders from 19 middle and high schools, where students completed questionnaires about sleep and self-regulation, including cognitive aspects, behavioural aspect and emotional aspects.

Nearly 22 per cent of the students reported sleeping less than seven hours on school nights.

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Sleep duration, daytime sleepiness and chronotype were clearly interconnected — night owls slept less on school nights and were subsequently sleepier in the daytime, as were those who slept for fewer hours.

But when the researchers examined all three aspects of sleep and adjusted for age, socio-demographic factors and mental health conditions like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression and anxiety, it was daytime sleepiness and “night owl” tendencies that independently predicted impaired self-regulation — while sleep duration did not.

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Sleepier adolescents reported significantly worse self-regulation, as did teens who tended to be “night owls” rather than “morning larks”.

The findings held for all types of self-regulation but were most robust for cognitive and emotional aspects.

“The misalignment or mismatch between early school start times and teens’ circadian rhythms — which normally shift later with puberty — may worsen self-regulation or so-called executive functioning,” Owens added. (IANS)

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Cyber Bullying Leads to Depression in Teenagers, Says Study

The study was scheduled to be presented at "SLEEP 2019" conference in Texas from June 8-12

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Depression is a major issue affecting millions of people, especially the teenagers. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Teenagers who experience cyber bullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep and depression, warns a study.

In one of the few studies to explore the connection between cyber victimisation and sleep quality, the research team from University at Buffalo examined the relationship between online bullying and depression among over 800 adolescents.

“Cyber victimisation on the Internet and social media is a unique form of peer victimisation and an emerging mental health concern among teenagers who are digital natives,” said Misol Kwon, a PhD student from University at Buffalo.

Nearly 15 percent of US high school students report being bullied electronically, said Kwon.

depression
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

At severe levels, depression may lead to disrupted school performance, harmed relationships or even suicide.

According to the US Office of Adolescent Health, nearly one third of teenagers have experienced symptoms of depression, which, in addition to changes in sleep pattern, include persistent irritability, anger and social withdrawal.

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“Understanding these associations supports the need to provide sleep hygiene education and risk prevention and interventions to mistreated kids who show signs and symptoms of depression,” Kwon added.

The study was scheduled to be presented at “SLEEP 2019” conference in Texas from June 8-12. (IANS)