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Popular Social Networking Site Twitter Releases 2016 Trending Topics: Here is a List of Top 5!

One of the most popular topic was the virtual reality game Pokemon Go, Twitter said

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FILE - The Twitter logo appears on a screen in Ventura, California. VOA

December 7, 2016: Give the Rio Olympics a gold medal. The Summer Games hosted in Brazil generated the year’s most tweets for a single topic, according to Twitter.

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The microblogging site shared its list of 2016’s top five trending topics on Tuesday.

Next on the list was the hotly contested U.S. presidential election, which saw Republican Donald Trump defeat Democrat Hillary Clinton.

The third most popular topic was the virtual reality game Pokemon Go, Twitter said.

At number four on the list was the Euro2016 soccer tournament, which saw Portugal take the title.

Rounding out the top five was the Oscars, which saw the movie “Spotlight” named best picture.

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Twitter also released the most popular tweets from around the world, including the simple “Limonada” (lemonade) tweet from a Spanish gamer known as elrubius. A post election tweet from Hillary Clinton was third on that list. In the tweet, she called on little girls to pursue their dreams.

While popular among some, Twitter has been facing headwinds, forcing layoffs and seeing the stock price tumble.

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In response, the company has has rolled out some changes to its service, including tweaking the 140-character limit.

Still, the company has seen its user base shrink as it struggles against social media giants Facebook and Snapchat. (VOA)

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About 25% Tweets Regarding Climate Change are Produced by Bots, Reveals Study

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter

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The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. Pixabay

A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts.

Bots are non-personal or automated accounts that post content to social media platforms.

While the findings of the study are yet to be published, The Guardian newspaper reported them after seeing the draft study.

The results suggest that online conversations about climate change are often distorted due to the activities of the bots.

According to a report in the BBC on Saturday, the research team at Brown University analysed 6.5 million tweets from around the time US President Donald Trump revealed his intention to remove the US from the Paris climate accord in 2017.

The analysis showed a quarter of tweets on climate change were likely posted by bots.

“These findings suggest a substantial impact of mechanized bots in amplifying denials messages about climate change, including support for Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris agreement,” stated the draft study, according to The Guardian.

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A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts. Pixabay

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter.

For the study, the researchers used a tool from Indiana University called Botometer, which uses an algorithm to assign a score to Twitter accounts based upon the likelihood they are automated.

ALSO READ: Google Indexes Invite Links To Private Group Chat on WhatsApp With a Simple Search

The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. (IANS)