Wednesday March 20, 2019

Pregnant Women To Be Vaccinated Against The Deadly Ebola Virus

Ring vaccination is a strategy that prevents the spread of the disease by vaccinating only those likely to be infected with the virus.

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Ring vaccination is a strategy that prevents the spread of the disease by vaccinating only those likely to be infected with the virus. VOA

An independent advisory body convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends pregnant women and breastfeeding women in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo be vaccinated against the deadly Ebola virus. Latest WHO figures put the number of Ebola cases in the DRC at 853, including 521 deaths since the beginning of the outbreak in August.

More than 80,000 people so far have been vaccinated against Ebola in the African country’s conflict-ridden North Kivu and Ituri provinces during the current outbreak. The vaccine is still in its experimental stage. But since 2015 it has been given to thousands of people in Africa, Europe and the United States.

The studies of the efficacy of the vaccine are not conclusive. However, they indicate the serum is safe and protects people against Ebola. On the basis of accumulated evidence, the group of immunization experts recommends continued ring vaccination for Ebola in DRC.

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The WHO says all vaccinated pregnant women will be closely monitored until the birth of their babies to see if there are any adverse effects. Pixabay

Ring vaccination is a strategy that prevents the spread of the disease by vaccinating only those likely to be infected with the virus. WHO spokesman, Tarek Jasarevic says the experts advise pregnant women at high risk of infection and death from Ebola should be given the vaccination.

“So, this aim, this vaccinating of women would protect them, provide them with more protection. But we also know that if we use this ring vaccination that women who are in the community that is vaccinated then have a low risk. So, it is really between risk and benefits and we hope that the use of the vaccine in pregnant women will generate some data for the future,” Jasarevic said.

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On the basis of accumulated evidence, the group of immunization experts recommends continued ring vaccination for Ebola in DRC. Pixabay

The group of experts advise the vaccine be given to pregnant women in their second or third trimester as well as to breastfeeding women and babies under one year old.

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The experts also recommend that one or more of three other new experimental Ebola vaccines be tested in areas neighboring the affected regions. They say pregnant and breastfeeding women should be included in these trials.

The WHO says all vaccinated pregnant women will be closely monitored until the birth of their babies to see if there are any adverse effects. (VOA)

Next Story

Know How Ohio Teenager Defined His Anti-Vaccine Mother, Believing It Caused Autism

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying "My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme ... God knows how I'm still alive," and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

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Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. VOA

An Ohio teenager who defied his anti-vaccine mother and received shots against several dangerous diseases was the star witness at a Senate hearing Tuesday.

Eighteen-year-old Ethan Lindenberger said he did his own research and concluded his mother is wrong in believing vaccines are unsafe and cause autism.

Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019.
Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019. VOA

Lindenberger said his mother’s “love, affection and care are apparent” but said his school in Norwalk, Ohio, saw him as a “health threat” because of the danger he could become sick with a contagious disease.

He testified that his own research convinced him vaccines are safe, but still failed to convince his mother.

Without her approval, Lindenberger got himself inoculated against hepatitis, influenza, tetanus, human papillomavirus, polio, and measles, mumps and rubella.

He said his mother still turns to what he calls “illegitimate sources that instill fear into the public.”

Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines.
Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines. VOA

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying “My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme … God knows how I’m still alive,” and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

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He said thousands of other kids posted similar statements and said he wants youngsters to know that they do not always need their parents’ permission to get vaccinated.

Tuesday’s Senate hearing on vaccines was called, in part, to address an outbreak of measles.

There are 200 known cases in 11 states so far this year with the Pacific Northwest hardest hit. (VOA)