Wednesday June 19, 2019

President of Nepal inaugurates spiritual learning centre in South Nepal

Spiritual Learning Centre inaugurated in Nepal in presence of Sri Sri Ravi Sankar expected to spread religious harmony

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A person practicing Buddhism (representational image), Pixabay

Kathmandu, March 8, 2017: Bidya Devi Bhandari- President of Nepal, today inaugurated a spiritual learning centre in Nepal saying that it will ensure religious harmony in the country. Located in Dumkauli of Nawalparasi in South Nepal, Shashwatdham is also expected to promote tourism.

Sri Sri Ravi Sankar, Art of Living Founder and former King Gyanendra graced the inauguration with their presence, mentioned PTI.

According to Bhandari, the pilgrimage centre would play a crucial role in inculcating goodwill and compassion among the people.

“Unity in cultural and religious diversities is Nepal’s unique identity,” she said.

The candle flame is the same for all religions; Source: Pixabay

A large number of people were present on the occasion including religious leaders from Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, saints, political party leaders, journalists and business entrepreneurs.

The construction of Shashwatdham has been completed in 15 years by a major business group, Chaudhary Foundation.

A learning Centre (representative); Source: Pixabay

This centre for spiritual learning is said to house a library, a Shiva temple, yoga hall, religious museum and a Gurukul for students willing to learn the Sanskrit language.

 

-Prepared by Nikita Saraf; Twitter: @niki_saraf

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Nepalese Government Concludes its Clean-up Drive on the Mount Everest with 11 Tonnes of Trash

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste

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Nepal
This photograph taken from a helicopter shows an aerial view of Mount Everest in Nepal's Solukhumbu district, some 140 kilometers (87 miles) northeast of Kathmandu, on Nov. 22, 2018. VOA

The Nepalese government on Monday concluded its clean-up drive of the Mount Everest and said it had collected nearly 11 tonnes of trash that had piled up on the peak for decades.

The clean-up initiative, the first of its kind since Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa conquered the summit 66 years ago, was launched in mid-April and involved an elite team of 12 high-altitude Sherpa climbers who spent over a month collecting the waste.

“Along with the rubbish, they also collected four dead bodies from the high camps of Mount Everest that were brought to Kathmandu last week,” Dandu Raj Ghimire, the Director-General of Nepal’s Tourism Department, told Efe news.

According to Ghimire, the clean-up campaign cost nearly 23 million rupees (some $207,000). He added that China had also launched a similar drive to clean the north side of the world’s highest mountain.

“There are big environmental concerns and criticism from the international community that Nepal has not shown seriousness to maintain the beauty of the iconic peak,” he added, while vowing that the government would continue to clear the human residues left on Mount Everest.

Ang Dorje Sherpa, the Chairman of the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC), said around seven tonnes of waste had been collected from the Everest Base Camp and the high camps.

The other four tonnes were removed from the villages of Lukla and Namche Bazar, both of which are considered the gateway to Everest.

Hundreds of foreign mountaineers spend thousands of dollars to conquer the peak every spring season, which normally begins in early April and lasts until May. As they go on the dangerous climb, they leave behind a trail of litter.

FILE – Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world, is seen in this aerial view March 25, 2008. VOA

Various stakeholders, including the Tourism Ministry, the Nepali Army, the Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Nepal Tourism Board, the Sagarmatha National Park, the SPCC and the local government have joined hands for this clean-up campaign.

In recent times, Everest has often earned the moniker of the world’s highest garbage dump.

Several tonnes of old equipment, oxygen cylinders, rubbish and human waste litter the famous mountain.

The government collects more than $3.55 million per year in revenue by issuing permits for climbers, but little had been spent so far to keep the ecosystem clean.

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In 2014, the government introduced a rule forcing each member of an expedition to bring back at least 8 kg of collected garbage, in addition to the trash they generate themselves.

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste.

The deposit is refunded only if the SPCC certifies that they have taken all their trash back down. But many commercial expeditions still end up leaving trash scattered among the gelid snow. (IANS)