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Protect Your Skin, Hair From Pollution

Satya Sharma, Beauty Expert at VLCC and hair and make up expert Aashmeen Munjaal of Star Salon and Academy list down some ways to combat pollution-related problems:

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Don't let pollution affect your hair, skin. Pixabay
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Pollution not only affects health but skin and hair as well as it can cause uneven skin tone, dryness, dehydration, wrinkles, dark spots, sagging and a deterioration of collagen. Anti-oxidant treatments, regular exfoliation and scrubbing can do the trick in good way for you in this weather.

Satya Sharma, Beauty Expert at VLCC and hair and make up expert Aashmeen Munjaal of Star Salon and Academy list down some ways to combat pollution-related problems:

* You need to pamper the skin and hair by cleansing, toning and then moisturizing to soothe the skin and make it feel less heavy and more calm. Nourishing is required for hair in order to get rid of frizz and dryness caused.

* Look for anti-oxidant treatments and spas that work as hydrating agents for hair. One way to prevent surface skin damage from free radicals is through antioxidants because they prevent them from potentially causing signs of ageing in the body. An example of a good hydrating spa therapy is the Moroccan Oil Spa which is infused with antioxidant-rich argan oil and vitamin E and helps to repair the damaged hair. It also helps to strengthen the hair and deeply moisture it from the follicle to the tip.

* Use an anti – pollution spray for your hair before going out. For skin also you need to have good protection by applying sunscreen, aloe vera gel and other skin protectors which laminates your skin and form a protective layer. It locks your skin for 6-7 hours and helps to control damage from pollution.

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Hence, choose products and treatments which contain natural oils and moisturizing agents like rosemary, amino acids, and sea algae which is rich in protein. Pixabay

* Polluted and contaminated water along with shampoo, sprays, setting lotions, and over drying process damage the hair. Polluted and contaminated water forms a mineral layer on top of the cuticle, leading to less flexibility of the hair and the ends becoming dry. It can also lead to premature graying and balding.

Hence, choose products and treatments which contain natural oils and moisturizing agents like rosemary, amino acids, and sea algae which is rich in protein.

* Regular exfoliation and scrubbing, applying glow pack is also necessary to keep skin hydrated and rejuvenating. Home made packs can also be great to fight with the toxic pollutants when you move out.

Also Read- ASUS Launches its Flagship Gaming Phone

* Anti-pollution skin care regime is on the rise, with people looking for oxygen facials to deal with rising pollution levels. The oxygen facial delivers oxygen to the deepest layers of the skin. Not only do you get the life-restoring powers of oxygen, but the facial promotes hydration and delivers essential antioxidants, nutrients and botanicals to your skin.

*Sometimes due to pollution, skin becomes oily, agitated and congested. Charcoal treatment is the perfect solution for congested skin suffering from environmental pollution. Activated charcoal draws bacteria, chemicals, dirt and other micro-particles to the surface of the skin, helping you achieve a flawless complexion. It is also very effective for treating and managing acne. (IANS)

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Air Pollution Worsens In Western Balkan Cities

Activists say the funds allocated are insufficient and that the government's response is inadequate.

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General view of the city as smog blankets Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. VOA

When winter arrives in the Western Balkans, it is not unusual for dense smog to envelop its cities, making it hard to breathe and impairing visibility. But this year, air pollution levels are among the highest in the world and public anger is on the rise.

In recent days, the Bosnian, Macedonian and Kosovar capitals topped the charts of the world’s most polluted cities as the smog intensified due to heavy traffic, excessive use of coal, poor spatial planning and solid fuel based heating.

The air quality index measured by the U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo hit 383 on Tuesday, a level identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as hazardous to health and almost 10 times the average. In Pristina, the index registered 415 on Monday night and marked air quality in several Macedonian towns as very poor.

“This is all the result of a situation in which political elites treat the city as a construction plot which should be occupied at all costs rather than a place where people live,” Anes Podic of Sarajevo’s Eko Akcija environmental group said.

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The sun is seen through evening air pollution, Feb. 8, 2018. VOA

“You can feel how bad the air smells even inside the car or home,” said a taxi driver Mirsad Pobric.

According to the WHO, pollution costs Bosnia the equivalent of more than a fifth of its annual gross domestic product (GDP) every year — around $3.9 billion — in lost work and school days, healthcare and fuel costs.

Macedonia loses an equivalent of 3.2 percent of GDP a year to pollution, the World Bank said in a report, more than$360 million a year.

As a way of bringing more attention to the issue, the Embassy of Sweden has been using red lighting on its facade in central Sarajevo to reflect air quality each day. The deeper the red, the worse the pollution.

According to the WHO, 230 Bosnians die of air pollution per 100,000 citizens a year, compared to 0.4 in Sweden. The World Bank estimates that in Macedonia there are 1,350 deaths related to air pollution per year.

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Sweden has launched a four-year project in Bosnia that will bring together experts from its Environmental Protection Agency .Wikimedia Commons

“Pollution is killing people of Bosnia and Herzegovina, therefore something really needs to be done,” Swedish Ambassador Anders Hagelberg told Reuters.

As part of efforts to combat the issue, Sweden has launched a four-year project in Bosnia that will bring together experts from its Environmental Protection Agency and local hydro-meteorological agencies and governments.

The aim of the program is to help improve air quality monitoring but also to bring more investment into energy efficiency.

Also Read: U.N. Chief Warns The World About Not Doing Enough To Prevent Climate Change

Macedonia has launched its own program to combat air pollution to which the government allocated 1.6 million euros ($1.83 million) in next year’s budget. It aims to halve Skopje’s air pollution within two years by reducing taxes for central heating, restricting traffic and introducing stricter control of industrial emissions.

Activists say the funds allocated are insufficient and that the government’s response is inadequate. (VOA)