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Protest against Orlando Shooting: Hackers post Gay porn links on varied IS supporter’s Twitter accounts

WauchulaGhost has accessed over 200 Twitter accounts of Islamic State supporters and flooded them with pornography

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Gay Parade. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • The Jihadi extremist messages were replaced with messages like  “I’m gay and proud” and “Out and proud”
  • No explicit images were posted, as the were directed at Jihadist extremists
  • Remaining anonymous, all he says is that he is based in the United States and that “shit is getting too close to home”

To defend the lives that were lost, over 200 twitter accounts belonging to ISIS supporters were accessed by hacker WauchulaGhost, and their extremist messages were replaced with links to gay porn and pro-LGBT content.

Social media platforms have been used by ISIS as a tool for recruitment and to spread propaganda. Most of the accounts accessed operate out of Syria, Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

WauchulaGhost is an online moniker used by a hacker affiliated with the hacktivist collective Anonymous. After the Orlando shooting on June 13, WauchulaGhost along with hackers Ebony and Yeti took to replacing the extremist messages as a sign of protest against the shooting.

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The hacker tells Newsweek, “I did it for the lives lost in Orlando. Daesh [ISIS] have been spreading and praising the attack, so I thought I would defend those that were lost. The taking of innocent lives will not be tolerated. Our actions are directed at Jihadist extremists. Many of our own [group of hackers] are Muslim and we respect all religions that do not take innocent lives.”

Twitter account. Image Source: Newsweek

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The Jihadi extremist messages were replaced with messages like  “I’m gay and proud” and “Out and proud”. As their purpose was not to offend Muslims and were only directed at Jihadist extremists, no explicit images were posted.

Though  many of the posts have since been taken down by Twitter, the group plans to continue the campaign, said a Scroll.in report.

Remaining anonymous, all he says is that he is based in the United States and that “shit is getting too close to home.”

-prepared by Ajay Krishna an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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Researchers Discover Serious Security Issues in Computer Chips Made by Intel

Once discovered, the flaws were reported to the chipmakers by the WPI researchers, who also have described the flaws in a paper

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Intel
The chipmaker Intel announced earlier this year that more than 1 billion ST33 chips have been sold. Wikimedia Commons

An international team of researchers has discovered serious security vulnerabilities in computer chips made by chip giant Intel and Geneva-based semiconductor manufacturer STMicroelectronics that has affected billions of laptop, server, tablet and desktop users globally.

The two vulnerabilities, which have now been addressed, would have allowed hackers to employ timing side-channel attacks to steal cryptographic keys that are supposed to remain safely inside the chips.

The recovered keys could be used to compromise a computer’s operating system, forge digital signatures on documents, and steal or alter encrypted information.

The flaws are located in TPMs, or trusted platform modules, which are specialized, tamper-resistant chips that computer manufacturers have been deploying in nearly all laptops, smartphones and tablets for the past 10 years.

“If hackers had taken advantage of these flaws, the most fundamental security services inside the operating system would have been compromised,” said Berk Sunar, professor of electrical and computer engineering and leader of Vernam Lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts.

“This chip is meant to be the root of trust. If a hacker gains control of that, they’ve got the keys to the castle,” Sunar warned.

Intel
An international team of researchers has discovered serious security vulnerabilities in computer chips made by chip giant Intel and Geneva-based semiconductor manufacturer STMicroelectronics that has affected billions of laptop, server, tablet and desktop users globally. Pixabay

Following an international security standard, TPMs are used to secure encryption keys for hardware authentication and cryptographic keys, including signature keys and smart card certificates.

Pushing the security down to the hardware level offers more protection than a software-only solution and is required by some core security services.

WPI security researchers Sunar and Daniel Moghimi led an international team of researchers that discovered these two serious security vulnerabilities.

One of the flaws the WPI team discovered is in Intel’s TPM firmware, or fTPM–software that runs in the Security and Management Engine in processors the company has produced since it launched its Haswell processor in 2013.
Haswell CPUs are used in the popular Core i3, i5, and i7 family of processors.

The second flaw is in STMicroelectronics’ TPM.

Notably, the STMicroelectronics’ vulnerability is in a chip that has received a strong industry-recognized security certification from “Common Criteria” — a highly acknowledged security stamp of approval based on international specifications designed to ensure technology meets high security standards preferred in industrial and government deployments.

The WPI researchers worked with Thomas Eisenbarth, a professor of IT security at the University of Lubeck in Germany, and Nadia Heninger from University of California, San Diego.

Once discovered, the flaws were reported to the chipmakers by the WPI researchers, who also have described the flaws in a paper to be presented at the “29th USENIX Security Symposium” in Boston next August.

“We provided our analysis tools and results to Intel and STMicroelectronics and both companies worked with us to create a patch or make sure a security patch will be provided for the next generation of these devices,” said Moghimi.

Intel
The two vulnerabilities, which have now been addressed, would have allowed hackers to employ timing side-channel attacks to steal cryptographic keys that are supposed to remain safely inside the Intel chips. Wikimedia Commons

Moghimi explained that if hackers gained access to the Intel software, they could forge digital signatures, enabling them to alter, delete, or steal information.

The research team discovered another flaw in the STMicroelectronics’ TPM, which is based on the company’s popular ST33 chip.

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The chipmaker announced earlier this year that more than 1 billion ST33 chips have been sold. (IANS)