Monday March 25, 2019
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Qatar mall visitors assault Indian man for insulting Islam

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Showing the insensitive side of human beings, a video of an Indian man from Kerala being assaulted by a group of men in Qatar has gone viral on social media channels.

The video shows several men hitting the man, while some others are trying to stop them from doing so.

The incident reportedly happened outside a mall in Doha over some anti-Islamic posts on Facebook. The group accosted the man about anti-Prophet comments on Facebook. Later, other customers also joined the group and started bashing up the man.

According to some reports, the man contested the allegations and said that this was a case of mistaken identity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iec_Zcj-wgg

BBC reported that the Kerala state president of BJP party, V Muraleedharan, citing Qatar authorities, wrote in a Facebook post that the injured man had not committed the crime that he had been accused of.  Muraleedharan also said that the man would be released after an investigation into his assault.

The Indian embassy said in an email to the news channel that they have demanded “thorough investigations into an unfortunate incident in which an Indian national was reportedly beaten up by some persons on 8 May 2015.”

It was also reported that the embassy is concerned about the well-being of this person and has sought consular access to him.

This shameful incident has been criticized globally by the Indian diasporas. The over-zealous people who perpetrated the attack have been condemned severely for taking the law in their hands.

“It was an unnecessary act. Even if he did say something offensive, there is a legal system in place. I am proud of being from a state where Muslims, Hindus and Christians live in harmony,” told Fahd Abubaker to the news channel in Qatar.

This is not the first time that a resident in Qatar had to face consequences of posting something online. In February, a teacher working in an Indian school had to resign after she posted a caricature of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The image had his face over a body of a black and white dog relieving itself.

According to the US State Department’s International Religious Freedom Report of 2013, insulting certain religions in Qatar is a punishable offence. Even the new cyber crime laws have made it illegal to post or share online content that “undermines” Qatar’s “social values” or “general order.”

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Should Live Broadcast on Social Media Platforms be Banned?

Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India

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Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India. Pixabay

Would you want your teenager to watch terrorists killing people in the real world or someone committing suicide? No one, in their right mind, would ever want their kids to get exposed to such events, simply for the repercussions that such content can have on young impressionable minds.

But with a smartphone on their hand and Facebook installed in it, chances of them watching such horrific content some day cannot be denied, especially because the social media giant allows all its users to go live.

The 28-year-old Australian who sprayed bullets on innocent people who were praying at mosques in New Zealand on March 15 decided to broadcast his act on Facebook.

Facebook said the video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast, but it was watched about 4,000 times before being removed from the platform. By that time, copies of the 17-minute video were later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

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The 28-year-old Australian who sprayed bullets on innocent people who were praying at mosques in New Zealand on March 15 decided to broadcast his act on Facebook. Pixabay

Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India. So does that mean that live broadcast on social media platforms should be banned?

“What happened in New Zealand was one-of-a-kind heinous exhibition of brutality and terror. I don’t think the world has become so bad that we should see such things occurring repetitively,” Faisal Kawoosa, Chief Analyst at market research firm techARC, told IANS.

“Live streaming is an essential part of social media platforms and as video becomes the default mode of communication over digital platforms, live streaming empowers users to be real time on these platforms,” he added.

Youngsters also find the facility, which is also available on YouTube and Instagram, useful for broadcasting their travelling adventures and tutorials.

“The ‘live’ feature on social networking platforms could be good for people who want to publicise stuff like their travel, fashion or subject tutorials,” said 25-year-old Rijul Rajpal who works with a film production company.

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The social media giant may face similar questions from lawmakers in other countries in the coming days. Pixabay

Many even find it helpful for connecting with their favourite film stars and music icons. But despite the usefulness of the feature, one cannot deny the potential of misuse of the feature, especially because the social media companies have still not developed a technology that can prevent the broadcast of live shooting.

Facebook said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) system could not automatically detect the New Zealand shooting video as the system was not properly trained. It promised to improve its technology so that broadcast of such videos can be prevented in the future.

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But policy makers are not impressed. In the US, tech firms have already been asked to brief the Congress on March 27 regarding their response to dissemination of the video of the New Zealand terrorists attack on their platforms.

The social media giant may face similar questions from lawmakers in other countries in the coming days. (IANS)