Monday June 18, 2018

Radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage: study

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A study shows that radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage.
A study shows that radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage. IANS
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New York, Dec 14, 2017: Pregnant women’s exposure to non-ionising radiation from smartphones, Bluetooth devices and laptops may double the risk of miscarriage, a study has showed.

Non-ionising radiation — radiation that produces enough energy to move around atoms in a molecule, but not enough to remove electrons completely — from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are in use and electricity is flowing.

It can be generated by a number of environmental sources, including electric appliances, power lines and transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks.

While the health hazards from ionising radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionising radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente — a US-based health care firm.

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team asked for 913 pregnant women over age 18 to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours.

After controlling for multiple other factors, women who were exposed to higher magnetic fields levels had 2.72 times the risk of miscarriage than those with lower magnetic fields exposure.

The increased risk of miscarriage associated with high magnetic fields was consistently observed regardless of the sources of high magnetic fields. The association was much stronger if magnetic fields was measured on a typical day of participants’ pregnancies.

The finding also demonstrated that accurate measurement of magnetic field exposure is vital for examining magnetic field health effects.

“This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” Li noted.

“We hope that the finding from this study will stimulate much-needed additional studies into the potential environmental hazards to human health, including the health of pregnant women,” he said. (IANS)

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A spurt in Unneeded Medical Interventions for Healthy Pregnant Women: WHO Study

WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after

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WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus paid homage to his predecessor, Margaret Chan, saying the reforms begun under her leadership to make the World Health Organization more responsive and better able to tackle emergencies were now paying off.
The World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of the WHO, passed a number of resolutions aimed at improving global health. Wikimedia Common
  • WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions
  • WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal
  • WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Given the trend, WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions.

The organization reports most of the estimated 140 million annual births occur without complications. Yet, it says over the past 20 years there has been a significant rise in medical interventions previously used to avoid risks. These include oxytocin infusion to speed up labour and caesarean sections.

WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal. This is based on a long-held benchmark for cervical dilation to occur at a rate of one centimetre per hour.

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Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation.

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay
The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay

He says WHO has set another boundary for cervical dilation of up to five centimetres per hour during the first stage of labour until the woman is ready to push out the baby.

“It should not be longer than 12 hours for first-time mothers. And it should not be longer than 10 hours in subsequent labours…. So, as long as a woman is making some progress within that time frame, and the condition of the mother as well as the baby are reassuring, then there should be no reason for intervening,” Oladapo said.

WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike. WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after.

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These include permitting a woman to have a companion of choice present during labour and childbirth; ensuring good communication between women and health providers; and allowing women to make decisions about their pain management, labour and birth positions. (VOA)