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Recreated horror: App to show consequences of Hiroshima bombing on your hometown

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

An app which allows one to envision and map out the scale of destruction of a nuclear bombing, similar to what happened in the Hiroshima blasts.

Photo credit: genius.com
Photo credit: genius.com

This app, Nukemap, developed by a historian of science, Alex Wellerstein, simulates the consequences of a nuclear bombing. It shows you the destruction which can happen if a bomb like the Little Boy bomb (codename of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima)—or more developed and more destructive bombs—were to be dropped in the fallout area or location mapped.

It shows you what will happen to your home if such a disastrous thing were to happen.

According to the app features, users can select from a range of locations, preset bombs (like Little Boy and Fat Man, which were dropped on Japan), choose exactly how the bomb is to be dropped and detonated—and you get to see the effects plotted on a map and the casualties counted up.

Public Radio International (PRI), a global non-profit media company, developed a similar application which shows the effects of the Hiroshima bombing on any other location.

According to a report prepared by the US Army one year after the Hiroshima attack, in the actual bombing about 66,000 people perished, 69,000 were injured and tens of thousands more were affected by radiation disease.

How hard is it to imagine this disaster and its destructive power once again?

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NASA: Parachutes Pass Drop Test, Will be Installed In Orion Spacecraft

The parachute system were "deployed as planned after being dropped from an altitude of 6.6 miles [10.6 kilometers) on July 12, at the US Army Proving Ground in Yuma, Arizona", NASA said in a statement.

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NASA probe finds water on asteroid Bennu. Pixabay

The parachutes for NASA’s next crew vehicle, the Orion capsule, intended to carry humans to deep space, has successfully passed a drop test, the US space agency said.

Orion’s full parachute system includes 11 parachutes three forward-bay cover parachutes, two drogue parachutes, three pilot parachutes, and three main parachutes.

These are designed to reduce the capsule’s speed during its descent back to Earth, supporting a safe landing in the ocean.

The parachute system were “deployed as planned after being dropped from an altitude of 6.6 miles [10.6 kilometers) on July 12, at the US Army Proving Ground in Yuma, Arizona”, NASA said in a statement.

Data from, the seventh of eight total tests, “will help NASA engineers certify Orion’s parachutes for missions with astronauts” to moon and Mars.

The test evaluated parachute deployment under conditions that exceeded the requirements for a system carrying crew.

NASA
The test evaluated parachute deployment under conditions that exceeded the requirements for a system carrying crew. Pixabay

Engineers dropped the dart-shaped test article from an altitude that allowed it to generate enough speed to simulate almost twice as much force on the main chutes as would be expected under normal conditions.

Each of Orion’s three main parachutes expands to 116 feet in diameter and contains enough fabric to cover 80 yards of a football field, but is carried aboard Orion in containers the size of a large suitcase.

For storage, the parachutes are compacted with hydraulic presses at forces of up to 80,000 pounds, baked for two days and vacuumed sealed.

Once packed, they have a density of about 40 pounds per cubic foot, which is roughly the same as wood from an oak tree.

Also Read- Nasa Developing Technology to Protect from Space Radiation to reach Mars Safely

The last test in the series, scheduled for September, will use a capsule-shaped test article representative of the spacecraft NASA will use on Orion’s upcoming missions (IANS)