Monday August 19, 2019
Home Politics Republican Do...

Republican Donald Trump’s First 100 Days: What Are His Plans as President of the United States?

Responding to criticisms that his platform lacked specifics and solid plans, Trump laid out a list of proposals for what he wanted to accomplish once reaching the Oval Office

0
//
100 Days
Donald Trump, then a candidate for the U.S. presidency, holds a sign supporting his plan to build a wall between the United States and Mexico that he borrowed from a member of the audience at his campaign rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina, March 9, 2016. VOA

November 13, 2016: In October, Donald Trump laid out his agenda for his first 100 days as president of the United States.

Responding to criticisms that his platform lacked specifics and solid plans, Trump laid out a list of proposals for what he wanted to accomplish once reaching the Oval Office.

Proposals were divided into three categories: measures to “clean up the corruption and special interest collusion” in Washington, actions to protect American workers, and restoration of security and the constitutional rule of law.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Additionally, Trump proposed 10 legislative measures he intended to work with Congress on, including repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama’s signature health care plan that expanded medical insurance to millions of Americans. Trump and other critics have said the plan of costs too much and provides inferior care. The controversial health care measure, known as Obamacare, was signed into law in 2010.

A man holds up a "Drain the Swamp in Washington DC" sign as then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event on the tarmac of the airport in Kinston, North Carolina, Oct. 26 2016. VOA
A man holds up a “Drain the Swamp in Washington DC” sign as then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event on the tarmac of the airport in Kinston, North Carolina, Oct. 26 2016. VOA

‘Drain the swamp’

In the first category of his efforts to “drain the swamp” of Washington, Trump listed six initiatives, including tightening regulations on lobbyists.

The first of these six, imposing term limits on all members of Congress, would actually have to be initiated and approved by the Senate, because it would require a constitutional amendment. Constitutional amendments are proposed by Congress, not the president. Although Republicans hold a majority in both houses, it is still not clear how much support some of Trump’s proposals will receive from Congress. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has already said he opposes term limits.

Another proposal on Trump’s list is a hiring freeze on all federal employees to reduce the size of the federal workforce through attrition. This is most likely supported by Republican lawmakers, whose spending plans for years have called for reducing the number of non-national-security employees.

Of the seven proposals Trump made regarding the protection of American workers, three of them are related to the environment and U.S. energy policy, including approving construction of the controversial Keystone pipeline, canceling payments to U.N. climate change programs, and lifting restrictions on the production of shale oil, natural gas and clean coal.

Other proposals include rejecting the Trans-Pacific Partnership and renegotiating a number of other trade deals, including the North American Free Trade Agreement.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Trump listed five actions to restore “security and the constitutional rule of law,” one of which is filling the Supreme Court seat held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia — an action Obama tried to take, only to be blocked by the Senate.

Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., right, speaks with Lenka Mendoza of Dumfries, Va., who is originally from Peru, during a rally in front of the White House in support of executive action addressing immigration reform, Nov. 19, 2014. VOA
Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., right, speaks with Lenka Mendoza of Dumfries, Va., who is originally from Peru, during a rally in front of the White House in support of executive action addressing immigration reform, Nov. 19, 2014. VOA

Cancel ‘unconstitutional’ orders

Other actions deal largely with immigration issues. The first proposal is to cancel all executive actions, memoranda and orders issued by Obama that Trump has labeled “unconstitutional.” Of these, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is one that could end, affecting protection for more than 1 million immigrants who were brought to the country as children.

Trump also stated his intention to remove undocumented immigrants with criminal records from the country, as well as suspend immigration from “terror-prone” countries from which he contends immigrants cannot safely be vetted.

Another is his proposal to build a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico, which he reaffirmed the Mexican government would ultimately pay for. Mexico’s president told Trump in a meeting earlier this year that Mexico would not finance a wall.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The full transcript of Trump’s speech in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, that outlined his plan for his first 100 days in office can be seen here. (VOA)

Next Story

63% of American Workers are Stressed and Ready to Quit their Jobs. Why?

The survey involved 1,001 respondents who answered questions online between January 31 and February 12

0
american workers, stressed
Deskless workers feel there is a communication imbalance when compared to those employees who work at a desk, according to a new survey. Photo: AP VOA

Sixty-three percent of American workers are stressed and ready to quit, and poor communication is a leading cause of their frustration, according to a survey commissioned by Dynamic Signal, a California-based company that sells employee communication and engagement platforms to companies.

Eighty percent of U.S. employees report feeling stressed because of ineffective company communication, which is a 30 percent increase from a year ago.

The survey involved 1,001 respondents who answered questions online between January 31 and February 12.

Among the most frustrated workers are the 80 million hourly employees who rarely have access to a work email. These non-desk workers include people employed in retail stores, hotels, restaurants, bars, production facilities, warehouses and hospitals, as well as delivery drivers.

american workers, stressed
A new survey finds 70% of employees feel overwhelmed by inefficient communication while on the job. VOA

Deskless employees are four times more likely to agree that their company communicates more effectively with office employees than it does with them.  In addition, the survey finds that workers spend up to two hours of each workweek looking for information they need to perform their daily tasks.

“I think companies are doing same job they’ve done forever, but expectations of their employees has evolved,” says Russ Fradin, Dynamic Signal’s CEO. “Because whether it’s your bank account balance or your Tinder match or your sports score … that’s all basically pushed to you immediately, so that makes the frustration when you hear about something you needed to know for your job an hour later, three days later or two weeks later, I think probably that much more frustrating.”

Other studies also reflect growing dissatisfaction with internal communications at work. A 2017 Gallup Poll found just 13 percent of employers found company communications to be effective. A 2015 poll found that 74 percent of U.S. employees feel they are “missing out on company news and information.”

Using posters in the break room or on the factory floor, or newsletters and magazines to communicate with employees might have been effective before the advent of smartphones. But now that the vast majority of Americans – 77 percent – own a smartphone, companies like Fradin’s, as well as the Harvard Business Review, are making the case for using mobile apps to improve employee communications.

That would allow employees to receive information about schedules, pay stubs, company announcements and benefits directly to a mobile device, even if they don’t have a company email.

ALSO READ: Whooping Cranes, Ravens, Peregrine Falcons are Celebrities of Sky in Eyes of Americans: Study

“It’s really just about bringing the types of tools around your mobile phone that everyone is used to in their day-to-day life, into the workforce,” Fradin says. “There is a way that folks are used to receiving all of their information and workplaces have not kept up with that.”

Improving internal communications can boost the bottom line. Companies with higher employee engagement retain more workers and bring in higher profits, according to Gallup’s 2017 State of the American Workplace report. (VOA)