Wednesday September 19, 2018

Researchers In China Discover a Potential Antibiotic

Further tests are needed to see whether the substance is safe and effective to use as a drug against bacterial infections.

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Antibiotic
Chinese researchers identify potential new antibiotic. Pixabay
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A fungal compound has been identified by a team of Chinese researchers as a promising antibiotic candidate, as they presented an approach that can efficiently obtain it the lab, said a study recently published in the journal Nature Communication.

Health organisations across the world are trying to reduce the use of antibiotics. Because the overuse of antibiotics in recent years means they’re becoming less effective and has led to the emergence of “superbugs” — strains of bacteria that have developed resistance to many different types of antibiotics, Xinhua news agency reported.

Antibiotic
Health organisations across the world are trying to reduce the use of antibiotics. Pixabay

Meanwhile researchers are working hard to find new antibiotics.

A team, led by researchers at China’s Chongqing University, has developed a technique to synthesize albomycins, a group of fungal compounds that have previously shown antimicrobial properties. The authors were able to obtain the substances in large enough amounts to allow them to test their antibiotic activity.

One substance performed well in a test against a variety of bacterial strains. Notably, it outperformed several established antibiotics.

Antibiotic
Misuse of antibiotic drugs have lead to the threat of antimicrobial resistance, Pixabay

Also Read: Weight Loss Tip- Chinese Medicine Ingredient May Help Reduce Obesity

“The method we use can efficiently and conveniently synthesize albomycins substances, and initial animal lab test has demonstrated that these substances are safe, but we will continue our research on its safety,” said Yun He, Lead Author of the study.

Further tests are needed to see whether the substance is safe and effective to use as a drug against bacterial infections, according to the team. (IANS)

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Asthma Ups The Chance Of Obesity: Study

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood.

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

While obesity is already known as a risk factor for developing asthma, a new research led by one of an Indian-origin has showed that people with the airway disease are also more likely to become obese.

The study indicates that those who develop asthma as adults and those who have non-allergic asthma are at the greatest risk of obesity.

The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought and more research is needed to better understand and tackle these two growing health challenges, the researchers said.

Obesity, Asthma
They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on Flickr Commons

“We already know that obesity can be a trigger for asthma, perhaps via a physiological, metabolic or inflammatory change,” said Subhabrata Moitra, research student at the ISGlobal – the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

However, the researchers do not know the reason why having asthma increases the risk of developing obesity or whether different asthma treatments have any effect on this risk.

The team included 8,618 people from 12 countries who were followed for 20 years.

Obesity, Pregnancy
The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought. Pixabay

They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on. Among people who did not have asthma, 7.7 per cent were obese ten years later.

Also Read: Exposure to Pollen During Pregnancy May up The risk of Asthma in Kids

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood. It was also greater in people who had asthma but did not suffer with allergies, the findings showed.

The results were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Paris. (IANS)