Wednesday March 20, 2019
Home Lead Story Revenue Growt...

Revenue Growth Of Facebook Ads Slowing Down in The U.S: Report

According to a forecast by market research company eMarketer, Facebook will generate an estimated $23 billion in US ad revenue in 2018

0
//
Facebook, data
Facebook staring at bigger problems this year, warns analyst. VOA

While Facebook still maintains a double-digit growth in advertisement revenue in the US, the rate of that growth slowed down in the second and third quarters of 2018, according to data from a market research firm.

In the third quarter of 2018, Facebook’s year-over-year ad-revenue growth rate was 16 per cent, compared to the 30 per cent in the second quarter and 35 per cent in the first quarter of that year, Forbes reported on Monday citing data from Standard Media Index (SMI).

Facebook, data, photos
A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

Facebook, which has over two billion monthly active users globally, came under heavy criticism in 2018 for lapses in protecting user privacy and in removing misleading content from its platform.

“Facebook’s growth from national marketers is slowing, indicating that major brands are concerned with recent events there and are focusing on brand-safe environments,” SMI CEO James Fennessy was quoted in a statement.

Also Read: Insinia Security Hacks Celebrity Twitter Accounts in a Bid to Highlight Security Flaws

According to a forecast by market research company eMarketer, Facebook will generate an estimated $23 billion in US ad revenue in 2018 (and $54.4 billion globally, an increase of 36.3 per cent from 2017), the Forbes report said. (IANS)

Next Story

4,000 Viewed NZ Mosques Shootings Live, Claims Facebook

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram

0
facebook, social media
Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. Facebook said it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. VOA

Facing the flak over its inability to spot and remove the livestreaming of New Zealand mosque’s shooting, Facebook on Tuesday said 4,000 people viewed it before being taken down.

“The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast,” Chris Sonderby, VP and Deputy General Counsel, said in a blog-post. “Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4,000 times in total before being removed from Facebook,” Sonderby added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcasted graphic footage of shooting via Facebook Live for nearly 17 minutes. It was later shared in millions on other social media platforms.

Fifty people were killed in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian national Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

According to Facebook, the first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended. “Before we were alerted to the video, a user on ‘8chan’ posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site,” said Sonderby.

Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

“We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface,” he said.

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram.

Also Read- Netflix Not to Integrate its Services with Apple Streaming Platform

“Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems, including the use of audio technology,” Sonderby said.

“In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services,” he said. (IANS)