Thursday October 18, 2018

Salty Diet Reduces Thirst, Increases Hunger

The new results showed something different: salt stayed in the urine, while water moved back into the kidney and body

0
//
7
salty diet
The results confirmed that eating more salt led to a higher salt content in urine. Higher amounts of salt also increased overall quantity of urine. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

A salty diet causes people to drink less water while increasing hunger due to a higher need for energy, suggests new research.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, are based on a study carried out during a simulated mission to Mars.

“Cosmonauts” who ate more salt retained more water, were not as thirsty, and needed more energy, the results showed.

What does salt have to do with Mars? Nothing, really, except that on a long space voyage conserving every drop of water might be crucial.

The researchers said that the findings should be applicable whether a body is being sent to Mars or not.

In the study carried out by Natalia Rakova from Max-Delbrueck Centre for Molecular Medicine, Berlin in Germany and her colleagues, the participants were two groups of 10 male volunteers sealed into a mock spaceship for two simulated flights to Mars.

Salty food
Salty food. Pixabay

The first group was examined for 105 days and the second over 205 days. They had identical diets except that over periods lasting several weeks, they were given three different levels of salt in their food.

The results confirmed that eating more salt led to a higher salt content in urine. Higher amounts of salt also increased overall quantity of urine.

But the increase was not due to more drinking — in fact, a salty diet caused the participants to drink less. Salt was triggering a mechanism to conserve water in the kidneys.

Also Read: Yoga May Reduce Symptoms of Menstrual Disorders

“This water-conserving mechanism of dietary salt excretion relies on urea transporter-driven urea recycling by the kidneys and on urea production by liver and skeletal muscle,” the researchers said.

Before the study, the prevailing hypothesis had been that the charged sodium and chloride ions in salt grabbed onto water molecules and dragged them into the urine.

The new results showed something different: salt stayed in the urine, while water moved back into the kidney and body. (Bollywood Country)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Being Hungry Might Increase Your Stress Level

The findings showed that the animals experienced stress and depressed mood when they were hypoglycemic

0
business
There are a lot of issues to keep in mind when you try to make a decision about who suits the business. Pixabay

Sudden drop in glucose when you are hungry can have a negative impact on your mood, suggests new research.

The researchers wanted to investigate whether chronic, long-term hypoglycemia — low blood sugar — is a risk factor for developing depression-like behaviours.

“We found evidence that a change in glucose level can have a lasting effect on mood,” said Professor Francesco Leri from University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Published in the journal Psychopharmacology, the study examined the impact of a sudden glucose drop on emotional behaviour by inducing hypoglycemia in rats.

The rats were injected with a glucose metabolism blocker causing them to experience hypoglycemia.

They were then placed in a specific chamber. On a separate occasion, they were injected water and placed in a different chamber.

When given the choice of which chamber to enter, they actively avoided the chamber where they experienced hypoglycemia.

stress
Representational image. Pixabay

“This type of avoidance behaviour is an expression of stress and anxiety,” said Leri.

“The animals are avoiding that chamber because they had a stressful experience there. They don’t want to experience it again,” she added.

The researchers tested blood levels of the rats after they experienced hypoglycemia and found more corticosterone — an indicator of physiological stress.

The rats also appeared more sluggish when given the glucose metabolism blocker.

Also Read- Xiaomi Launches Range of Smart TVs in India

The findings showed that the animals experienced stress and depressed mood when they were hypoglycemic, Leri stated.

“When people think about negative mood states and stress, they think about the psychological factors, not necessarily the metabolic factors. But we found poor eating behaviour can have an impact,” lead researcher Thomas Horman from University of Guelph said. (IANS)

Next Story