Friday August 17, 2018

Salty Diet Reduces Thirst, Increases Hunger

The new results showed something different: salt stayed in the urine, while water moved back into the kidney and body

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salty diet
The results confirmed that eating more salt led to a higher salt content in urine. Higher amounts of salt also increased overall quantity of urine. Pixabay
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A salty diet causes people to drink less water while increasing hunger due to a higher need for energy, suggests new research.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, are based on a study carried out during a simulated mission to Mars.

“Cosmonauts” who ate more salt retained more water, were not as thirsty, and needed more energy, the results showed.

What does salt have to do with Mars? Nothing, really, except that on a long space voyage conserving every drop of water might be crucial.

The researchers said that the findings should be applicable whether a body is being sent to Mars or not.

In the study carried out by Natalia Rakova from Max-Delbrueck Centre for Molecular Medicine, Berlin in Germany and her colleagues, the participants were two groups of 10 male volunteers sealed into a mock spaceship for two simulated flights to Mars.

Salty food
Salty food. Pixabay

The first group was examined for 105 days and the second over 205 days. They had identical diets except that over periods lasting several weeks, they were given three different levels of salt in their food.

The results confirmed that eating more salt led to a higher salt content in urine. Higher amounts of salt also increased overall quantity of urine.

But the increase was not due to more drinking — in fact, a salty diet caused the participants to drink less. Salt was triggering a mechanism to conserve water in the kidneys.

Also Read: Yoga May Reduce Symptoms of Menstrual Disorders

“This water-conserving mechanism of dietary salt excretion relies on urea transporter-driven urea recycling by the kidneys and on urea production by liver and skeletal muscle,” the researchers said.

Before the study, the prevailing hypothesis had been that the charged sodium and chloride ions in salt grabbed onto water molecules and dragged them into the urine.

The new results showed something different: salt stayed in the urine, while water moved back into the kidney and body. (Bollywood Country)

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UN Report on Rohingya Hunger Crisis Suspended on Order of Myanmar Government

The current crisis began on August 25 when Rohingya insurgents attacked police checkpoints on Myanmar's Rakhine state and killed 12 security personnel.

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Rohingya
Rohingya refugees collect aid supplies including food and medicine, sent from Malaysia, at Kutupalang Unregistered Refugee Camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Feb. 15, 2017, VOA

United Nations, October 17, 2017: The UN food aid agency withdrew a critical report revealing desperate hunger among the Rohingya Muslim minority after the Myanmar government ordered it to be taken down, the media reported on Tuesday.

The July assessment by the World Food Programme (WFP) warned that more than 80,000 children under the age of five were “wasting” – a potentially fatal condition of rapid weight loss, reports the Guardian.

The six-page document has since been replaced with a statement saying Myanmar and WFP were “collaborating on a revised version”.

That process would involve “representatives from various ministries, and will respond to the need for a common approach” that was in line with “WFP’s future cooperation with the government”.

When asked why the July report was removed, the WFP said it was withdrawn from the website “following a request by the government to conduct a joint review”, the Guardian reported.

In a statement, the agency said: “The WFP stands by its original assessment, which was conducted jointly with local authorities in Rakhine state… However WFP recognises that in a dynamic and evolving situation, it is important to coordinate closely with all partners, including the government.”

Meanwhile, the UN’s most senior official in the country is scheduled to leave at the end of the month amid allegations she suppressed another report and also attempted to shut down public advocacy on Rohingya suffering.

The current crisis began on August 25 when Rohingya insurgents attacked police checkpoints on Myanmar’s Rakhine state and killed 12 security personnel.

It resulted in over half a million Rohingya fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh, many alleging that the Myanmar Army conducted a counter-offensive that included mass killings and rapes.(IANS)