Tuesday March 19, 2019
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Samsung’s Galaxy S9 Now Supports Google’s ARCore

Samsung's latest flagships, Galaxy S9 and S9+ will reportedly now support Google's augmented reality (AR) developer platform, ARCore

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The South Korean tech giant also wants to focus on consumers' ease of use and convenience.

Samsung’s latest flagships, Galaxy S9 and S9+ will reportedly now support Google’s augmented reality (AR) developer platform, ARCore.

“Google has updated its ARCore support page listing both the Galaxy S9 and the Galaxy S9+ with all major variants. This means that users will be able to download the ARCore app from Google Play on these devices,” 9to5Google reported on Tuesday.

Google’s ARCore makes it easier for developers to use the smartphone’s combination of hardware and software to create AR applications. Without ARCore support, AR apps won’t run on phones as well as they could with Google’s optimization tools.

Also Read: Samsung Infusing AI into its Virtual Assistant Bixby

Once installed, the Galaxy S9 devices will give users access to ARCore applications like Just a Line, IKEA’s Place, and in-app features from Amazon or eBay.

Earlier this year, when Samsung launched the S9 family, the company had added that the devices would support Google’s AR developer platform but that was not the case during the launch. (IANS)

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Google Claims It Has “No Plans” To Relaunch A Search Engine in China

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

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The Chinese flag is seen near the Google sign at the Google china headquarters in Beijing, China. VOA

The United States’ top general said on Thursday that the Chinese military was benefiting from the work Alphabet Inc’s Google was doing in China, where the technology giant has long sought to have a bigger presence.

“The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Marine General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

“We watch with great concern when industry partners work in China knowing that there is that indirect benefit,” he said.

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Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market. Pixabay

“Frankly, ‘indirect’ may be not a full characterization of the way it really is, it is more of a direct benefit to the Chinese military.”

Last year Google said it was no longer vying for a $10 billion cloud computing contract with the U.S. Defense Department, in part because the company’s new ethical guidelines do not align with the project.

In June, Google said it would not renew a contract to help the U.S. military analyze aerial drone imagery when it expires, as the company sought to defuse an internal uproar over the deal.

At the same time, Google said it has “no plans” to relaunch a search engine in China, though it is continuing to study the idea.

During the hearing, Republican Senator Josh Hawley sharply criticized the tech company, referring to it as “a supposedly American company.”

FILE - Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019.
Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019. VOA

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market.

Also Read: India and Pakistan Threaten to Release Missiles at Each Othe

Asked about Dunford’s comments, Google referred to previous statements.

Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai has previously said the company has invested in China for years and plans to continue to do so, but that the company also was continuing to work with the U.S. government on projects in health care, cybersecurity and other fields. (VOA)