Tuesday October 24, 2017
Home Uncategorized Saudi enginee...

Saudi engineer invents biotechnology to clean-up oil spills

0
20
www.arabnews.com

Riyadh:  A Saudi engineer invented a biotechnology that could be used in cleaning up oil spills at land or sea.

“This substance in liquid form can decompose any fat into its smallest particles to get rid of it,” inventor Ibrahim Alalim told Arab Times.

www.arabnews.com
www.arabnews.com

Alalim named the technology ‘Al-Raheef’ which means ‘very elegant’ in Arabic. He took over 12 years to develop the technology.

“Al-Raheef involves a liquid extract from vegetables that could be instrumental in coming up with products that would be useful in cleaning utensils, floors and marble,” he said.  He further added, “If you spray it on an oil spill, it breaks down its composition and the sea water will be cleaned. The broken down composition will sink to the seabed and spraying it on sand with an oil spill cracks the oil to smaller particles and sinks into the soil like water.”

(IANS)

Next Story

Shaw: India needs to up its game in Science and Technology

0
91

Bengaluru: Biocon chairperson Kiran Mazumdar Shaw stated on Tuesday that India continues to be a sub-optimal country when it comes to investing in the science and technology sector.

Biocon Limited is an Indian bio-pharmaceutical company based in Bangalore, India headed by Indian entrepreneur Kiran Mazumdar Shaw. Shaw was awarded the Othmer Gold Medal for her outstanding contributions to the progress of science and chemistry in 2014.

“Amongst all the countries who invest in science and technology, we are at a sub-optimal level,” said Shaw at Bangalore India Bio.

Referring to South Korea, which is leading investments in science and technology, she said: “I think India needs to basically up its game in science and technology through greater investments.”

She requested the government to increase science and technology investments as it is the future of India.

According to the Biocon chairperson, India needs to invest $5 billion in biotechnology to achieve the target of growing the sector to $100 billion by 2025.

“Today biotechnology is a $11 billion sector, growing at a compounded annual growth rate of 20 percent. We also are aspiring to be a $100 billion sector by 2025,” she said.

Addressing the 16th edition of Bangalore India Bio, Union Science and Technology Minister Harsh Vardhan said: “A lot has been achieved in this field in the last 30 years. Bangalore is not only the hub of bio-tech, it is also the destination of all scientists in India. It is the science hub for India.”

He said the government allotted Rs 10,000 to support entrepreneurs and startups in biotechnology.

Scheduled from February 9-11, Bangalore India Bio will cover a spectrum of activities which include an international trade show, keynote talks and multi-track conferences among others.

As many as 25 sessions featuring 110 speakers will deliberate on topics like making tomorrow’s medicine, oncology and precision medicine, rare diseases and orphan drugs, agribiotechnology, synthetic bio-fuels and others. (IANS)

Next Story

NASA joins Norway’s annual oil spill cleanup exercise

0
29

Spill-010b-620x300

Washington: NASA for the first time, participated in Norway’s annual oil spill cleanup exercise in the North Sea from June 8 to 11.

Scientists flew a specialised NASA airborne instrument, called the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), on NASA’s C-20A piloted research aircraft to monitor a controlled release of oil into the sea, testing the radar’s ability to distinguish between more and less damaging types of oil slicks, NASA said in a statement.

Norway’s Oil on Water exercise has been held annually since the 1980s and in these drills, oil is released onto the ocean and then recovered, giving responders experience with existing cleanup techniques and equipment and a chance to test new technologies.

“This year was special, because we had our own dedicated science experiment in the middle of the training exercise,” said Camilla Brekke, associate professor in the department of physics and technology, at the University of Tromso, Norway.

Brekke invited scientists Cathleen Jones and Ben Holt from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, to participate in the experiment.

Radars “see” an oil spill, because of a characteristic that the Greek philosopher Aristotle first wrote about 2,500 years ago: pouring oil on water smooths the surface.

The Norwegian exercise released emulsions of differing thicknesses, so that the scientists could have a range of conditions to calibrate the UAVSAR data.

The experiment also tested the instrument’s ability to distinguish between petroleum, and plant-based oil, found in algal blooms.

Norway is one of a few nations worldwide that allow oil to be discharged at sea, to test new cleanup technologies and procedures. (IANS)