Monday December 10, 2018
Home World Scientists An...

Scientists Announce World’s First Baby Born with DNA from 3 Parents in Mexico

A report in New Scientist magazine says the baby boy was born five months ago in Mexico to Jordanian parents and is in good health

2
//
Republish
Reprint

September 28, 2016: Scientists have announced the world’s first baby born with DNA from three people.

A report in New Scientist magazine says the baby boy was born five months ago in Mexico to Jordanian parents and is in good health.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

U.S. fertility doctor John Zhang turned to Mexico for the birth because the technique is still banned in the United States.

The baby’s mother carries genes for a fatal nervous system disease called Leigh syndrome. She had passed on the illness to two previous children who died shortly after birth, and had suffered four miscarriages.

https://twitter.com/NewsGram1/status/750562580557598720

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Zhang isolated the disease-causing DNA from the mother’s nuclear DNA, injected her healthy DNA into a donor’s egg, and fertilized the egg with the father’s sperm.

Zhang plans to make a full presentation of the case at a medical meeting next month in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Federal health officials have banned the technique in the U.S. because earlier experiments resulted in babies with genetic disorders. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    This is very encouraging news. If disease causing genes can be separated probably one day mothers with AIDS can also have biological children

  • Antara

    Such medical miracles deserve huge appreciation! Great news!!

Next Story

New Genetic Disorder Found in Human Patient

The original ODC1 mouse model was developed by Thomas G. O'Brien in 1995 at the Lankenau Medical Research Centre in Pennsylvania

0
DNA
New ML-tool uses DNA to predict height and cancer risk. Pixabay

In a first, US researchers have identified a new genetic disorder, which was previously described in animal models, in a human patient.

Researchers from the Michigan State University found that the disorder is caused by mutations in a gene known as ornithine decarboxylase 1 (ODC1).

It is defined by a number of clinical features including large birth weight, enlarged head size, hair loss, reduced muscle strength, skin lesions, hearing loss and developmental delays.

“This remarkable case represents the first human example of a disorder that was described by researchers in a transgenic mouse model more than 20 years ago,” said Andre Bachmann, Professor at the varsity.

However, the disorder is, as of yet, unnamed, and its long-term effects, which include impacts on the neurological system, are not completely known.

The disorder was first identified on an 11-month-old baby girl in Michigan.

In the study, published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, blood samples for testing were drawn at age 19 months and 32 months.

gene
Gene (Representational image). IANS

Two developmentally normal, age/gender matched patients that were being sedated for outpatient same-day procedures served as controls.

Red blood cells obtained from the patient showed elevated ODC protein and polyamine levels compared to healthy controls.

“The ODC1 gene plays an important role in a number of physiological and cell developmental processes including embryo and organ development,” said Caleb Bupp, medical geneticist at Spectrum Health — a US-based health care company.

The study also showed that the ODC inhibitor DFMO — a water soluble — and US Food Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug may serve as a disease-modifying drug, and an early therapeutic trial in a new diagnosis may prevent some of the clinical symptoms.

Also Read- Breast Milk Boosts Brain Development in Premature Babies

DFMO has been used for many years in the treatment of trypanosomiasis — a tropical disease transmitted by biting insects and more recently entered clinical trials for pediatric neuroblastoma and colon cancer.

In mice, DFMO prevented hair loss and also partially restored hair growth and is considered a well-tolerated drug.

The original ODC1 mouse model was developed by Thomas G. O’Brien in 1995 at the Lankenau Medical Research Centre in Pennsylvania. (IANS)