Monday January 27, 2020

Scientists Claim, Absence Of KDM5 Protein in Flies Causes Autism

The study, published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, showed without the function of KDM5, the flies' intestinal mucosal barriers were damaged and their intestinal flora was imbalanced. 

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autism
"Many people with autism also have a serious intestinal illness, like diarrhea and irritable-bowel syndrome. It is consistent with our findings," Liu said. Pixabay

 Chinese scientists have discovered that absence of a certain protein in flies causes intestinal flora imbalance and makes them show symptoms similar to autism in humans.

The team, led by Professor Liu Xingyin of Nanjing Medical University in China, said the discovery could lead to a new theoretical path of treating autism based on digestion and immune activities, the Xinhua reported.

Xingyin said the KDM5-deficient drosophila melanogaster, or vinegar flies, kept their distance from one another, were slow to respond and had reduced direct contact with other flies.

autism
Former studies about autism usually focused on genetics,” he said. “We are looking forward to opening a new road for human autism therapy from the perspective of human digestion and the immune system,” Liu said. Pixabay

“All of these phenomena are similar to the communication disorders of people with autism,” Liu said.

The study, published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, showed without the function of KDM5, the flies’ intestinal mucosal barriers were damaged and their intestinal flora was imbalanced.

autism
The team, led by Professor Liu Xingyin of Nanjing Medical University in China, said the discovery could lead to a new theoretical path of treating autism based on digestion and immune activities, the Xinhua reported. Pixabay

“Many people with autism also have a serious intestinal illness, like diarrhea and irritable-bowel syndrome. It is consistent with our findings,” Liu said.

Also Read:High Level Of Insulin in Infants May Rise Chances Of Brain Damage
Further research also discovered that using antibiotics or feeding lactobacillus plantarum could improve social behaviour as well as the lifespan of some KDM5-deficient flies.

“Former studies about autism usually focused on genetics,” he said. “We are looking forward to opening a new road for human autism therapy from the perspective of human digestion and the immune system,” Liu said. (IANS)

 

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Horror Movies Manipulate Brain to Enhance Excitement: Study

Know why people get goosebumps while watching horror movies

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Horror Movies
Finnish researchers mapped neural activity as study participants watched horror movies, and found that our brains are continuously anticipating and preparing us for action in response to threat. Pixabay

Do you know why some people like to watch horror movies like ‘The Conjuring’ despite the scare and frequent shouting episodes? If we ask researchers, this is because scary flicks manipulate brain expertly to enhance excitement.

Finnish researchers mapped neural activity as study participants watched horror movies, and found that our brains are continuously anticipating and preparing us for action in response to threat.

“Horror movies exploit this expertly to enhance our excitement,” said researcher Matthew Hudson from University of Turku, Finland.

People found horror that was psychological in nature and based on real events the scariest, and were far more scared by things that were unseen or implied rather than what they could actually see.

Horror Movies
People found horror movies that were psychological in nature to be very interesting. Pixabay

The researchers first established the 100 best and scariest horror movies of the past century and how they made people feel.

Firstly, 72 per cent of people report watching at last one horror movie every six months, and the reasons for doing so, besides the feelings of fear and anxiety, was primarily that of excitement.

“Watching horror movies was also an excuse to socialise, with many people preferring to watch horror movies with others than on their own,” the findings showed.

While all movies have our heroes face some kind of threat to their safety or happiness, horror movies up the ante by having some kind of superhuman or supernatural threat that cannot be reasoned with or fought easily.

The research team at the University of Turku, Finland, studied why we are drawn to such things as entertainment?

People found horror that was psychological in nature and based on real events the scariest, and were far more scared by things that were unseen or implied rather than what they could actually see.

The team discovered two key findings.

“The creeping foreboding dread that occurs when one feels that something isn’t quite right, and the instinctive response we have to the sudden appearance of a monster that make us jump out of our skin,” said principal investigator Professor Lauri Nummenmaa.

Also Read- New Stretchable Battery Can Safely Store Power for Wearables

During those times when anxiety is slowly increasing, regions of the brain involved in visual and auditory perception become more active, as the need to attend for cues of threat in the environment become more important.

“After a sudden shock, brain activity is more evident in regions involved in emotion processing, threat evaluation, and decision making, enabling a rapid response,” said the researchers. (IANS)