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Shirdi: Dalit youth killed for keeping Ambedkar song as ringtone

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

A Dalit youth was brutally murdered, allegedly over his ringtone of a song on Dr. B.R.Ambedkar, in the temple town of Shirdi in Maharashtra.

Sagar Shejwal was a second year student of a nursing college in Nagpur. He came to Shirdi to attend a wedding ceremony and went to a local bar at 2 P.M. on May 16 with two of his cousins.

According to the police, “On hearing the ringtone, ‘Kara kitihi halla, majboot Bhimacha killa’ (Shout all you want, Bhim’s fortress is strong), which was in praise of Ambedkar’s work for Dalits, eight youths sitting there got agitated and asked him to switch it off.”

Sagar refused to switch off his phone, which led to an altercation, and one of the boys hit Sagar with a beer bottle and started kicking and punching him. Then, they dragged him out, put him on a motorcycle and took him away to a nearby forest, said the police.

The police said that the body was found on the evening of May 16 near Shingve village.

The attackers belong to the dominant Maratha and OBC communities, and allegedly ran their bike repeatedly over Sagar’s body, mutilating it, said a police officer.

The police stated that Sagar’s mobile was missing, but they are investigating the matter on the clue of CCTV footage.

Already four of the eight assailants have been arrested, two of the attackers were caught from Goa, one from Pune and the fourth from Shirdi itself, an official from Shirdi police station informed.

Those arrested were identified as Vishal Kote, Rupesh Wadekar, S Wadekar and Sunil Jadhav. Four other accused involved in the attack are still absconding, police said.

The attackers have been booked under Sections 302 (murder), 395 (punishment for dacoity), 201 (causing disappearance of evidence of offence), 109 (punishment of abetment) of the Indian Penal Code and Sections 3 (2) (v) and 3 (1) (X) of the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act.

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Africa: New Dresses, Youth Action – Ending Female Circumcision

Right now the civil society in Africa is truncated, you have fragmentation

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Africa, Dresses, Youth
FILE - A man shows the logo of a T-shirt that reads "Stop the Cut" referring to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) during a social event advocating against harmful practices such as FGM at the Imbirikani Girls High School in Imbirikani, Kenya, April 21, 2016. VOA

Hundreds of delegates from African governments and campaigners gathered in Senegal this week to discuss how to end female genital mutilation (FGM), which world leaders pledged to eradicate under a set of global goals agreed in 2015.

But the ancient ritual — which typically involves the partial or total removal of the external genitalia and can cause pain, infertility and death — remains deeply entrenched in many African countries despite years of activism.

Here are some quotes from participants at the summit, which ended Tuesday, on priorities for ending FGM in Africa:

Isatou Touray, Vice President of the Gambia

Africa, Dresses, Youth
Hundreds of delegates from African governments and campaigners gathered in Senegal this week to discuss how to end female genital mutilation (FGM). Pixabay

“What is missing is political will. Some countries have enacted acts but the enforcement of those instruments for the promotion of women’s and children’s rights — that is missing.

“Number two is the weak capacity of civil society. Right now the civil society in Africa is truncated, you have fragmentation. We need to have a strong movement.”

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of U.N. Women

“One area that I think is a gap is law enforcement. This is a crime. When people do it then they are breaking the law.

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“You don’t see prosecutions enough for crimes committed against women in general … from domestic violence to rape. So we need law enforcement to step it up.”

Fatou Ndiaye Deme, Women’s Ministry, Senegal

“What is missing is good coordination. The action also needs to be at the community level. It can’t just be high-level meetings, the community has to be involved.”

Mamadou Traore, Imam, Mali

Africa, Dresses, Youth
Some countries have enacted acts but the enforcement of those instruments for the promotion of women’s and children’s rights — that is missing. Pixabay

“The obstacle is the religiosity of the practice. Some religious leaders think it is part of Islam.

“Now that they have seen that there are negative consequences, some imams have asked to medicalize the practice.

We are working with doctors to show that you can’t medicalize it, because you don’t cut this part to heal but to wound.”

Virginia Lekumoisa, survivor and activist, Kenya

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“Using the power of the youth is what I feel like other countries are not doing.

“Maybe what makes us stand out [in Kenya] is the fact that we have backed this up with youth action and power from the youth networks, working to end FGM and actually taking action.”

Rugiatu Turay, chairwoman, Forum Against Harmful Traditional Practices, Sierra Leone

“One of the most important things is funding, because you have the willingness.

“We have communities that are now willing to remove the shrine [where FGM happens], but in removing the shrine we also have to put on some kind of fanfare and celebrations. We have to make sure the women will have new dresses. So it’s all about funding.”

Ifrah Ahmen, campaigner, Somalia

“We have the international support and we have international leaders who back us up but this is our issue.

“I think now is the time to ring the bell for African leaders to speak up.” (VOA)