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Shirdi: Dalit youth killed for keeping Ambedkar song as ringtone

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

A Dalit youth was brutally murdered, allegedly over his ringtone of a song on Dr. B.R.Ambedkar, in the temple town of Shirdi in Maharashtra.

Sagar Shejwal was a second year student of a nursing college in Nagpur. He came to Shirdi to attend a wedding ceremony and went to a local bar at 2 P.M. on May 16 with two of his cousins.

According to the police, “On hearing the ringtone, ‘Kara kitihi halla, majboot Bhimacha killa’ (Shout all you want, Bhim’s fortress is strong), which was in praise of Ambedkar’s work for Dalits, eight youths sitting there got agitated and asked him to switch it off.”

Sagar refused to switch off his phone, which led to an altercation, and one of the boys hit Sagar with a beer bottle and started kicking and punching him. Then, they dragged him out, put him on a motorcycle and took him away to a nearby forest, said the police.

The police said that the body was found on the evening of May 16 near Shingve village.

The attackers belong to the dominant Maratha and OBC communities, and allegedly ran their bike repeatedly over Sagar’s body, mutilating it, said a police officer.

The police stated that Sagar’s mobile was missing, but they are investigating the matter on the clue of CCTV footage.

Already four of the eight assailants have been arrested, two of the attackers were caught from Goa, one from Pune and the fourth from Shirdi itself, an official from Shirdi police station informed.

Those arrested were identified as Vishal Kote, Rupesh Wadekar, S Wadekar and Sunil Jadhav. Four other accused involved in the attack are still absconding, police said.

The attackers have been booked under Sections 302 (murder), 395 (punishment for dacoity), 201 (causing disappearance of evidence of offence), 109 (punishment of abetment) of the Indian Penal Code and Sections 3 (2) (v) and 3 (1) (X) of the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act.

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UNICEF Calls For Global Action to Prevent Cyberbullying

As part of this, it is implementing programmes to leverage the internet's promise of connectivity and education on behalf of the world's children

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Cyberattacks
An employee works near screens in the virus lab at the headquarters of Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Labs in Moscow, July 29, 2013. VOA

UNICEF on Tuesday called for global concerted action to prevent online violence, cyberbullying and digital harassment for over 70 per cent of children and young people online.

The call, made on Safer Internet Day, comes following a recent United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) poll of young people, which received more than a million responses over five weeks from more than 160 countries, and suggestions from a series of student-led #ENDviolence Youth Talks held around the world.

“We’ve heard from children and young people from around the globe and what they are saying is clear: The Internet has become a kindness desert,” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore.

That’s why, she said, UNICEF is inviting everyone, young and old, to be kind online, and calling for greater action to make the Internet a safer place for everyone.

According to the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), while 94 per cent of young people, aged 15-24 in developed countries are online, more than 65 per cent of young people in developing countries are online. This is well ahead of the pace of Internet usage among the general population. Worldwide, half of the total population, regardless of age, is online.

US Intelligence, Privacy
A specialist works at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, Va., Sept. 9, 2014. (VOA)

“This online proliferation comes with increased risk,” Fore said. According to data from UNESCO on the prevalence of cyberbullying in high-income countries, the proportion of children and adolescents who are affected by cyberbullying ranges from 5 per cent to 21 per cent, with girls appearing to be more likely to experience cyberbullying than boys.

Cyberbullying can cause profound harm as it can quickly reach a wide audience, and can remain accessible online indefinitely, virtually following its victims online for life. Victims of cyberbullying are more likely to use alcohol and drugs and skip school than other students. In extreme situations, cyberbullying has led to suicide.

In honour of the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, UNICEF also called for renewed urgency and cooperation to put children’s rights at the forefront of digital efforts.

Also Read- Google CEO Sundar Pichai Bets Big on YouTube For Future Growth

As part of this, it is implementing programmes to leverage the internet’s promise of connectivity and education on behalf of the world’s children.

“Thirty years after the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the creation of the World Wide Web, it is time for governments, families, academia and the private sector to put children and young people at the centre of digital policies,” said Fore. (IANS)