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Six new Indian schools to open in Qatar

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

Qatar which is home to around 600,000 expatriate Indians is soon going to have six Indian schools. These Indian schools are among 91 new private schools which have been given a approval to function by authorities in Qatar.

With the fees being on lower side, the move will help parents get admission for their wards, said a senior at the Supreme Education Council (SEC), while relaxing some of the admission procedures for private school students, The Peninsula newspaper reported.

The SEC has given initial approval to 91 new private schools to open in the next academic year, including six Indian schools, senior SEC official Ms Aisha Al Hashmi disclosed. Ms Aisha hinted that some existing Indian schools would open new branches very soon, probably by the next month.

By September 2015, six Indian schools will open, some of them will be only kindergartens and others will have classes for other grades as well. Schools which were not allowed to admit more students due to lack of seats will soon open branches, it could be even by April before the Indian Schools start their academic year, she said while addressing a news conference on Sunday.

The new schools will be an alternative option for parents and their fees will be lower compared to some other private schools, she added.

A total of 145,000 students are presently studying at private schools and 23,000 of them are Qataris.

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North Kivu and Ituri, Congo To Welcome More Than 80,000 Children in This New School Year

According to the latest World Health Organization estimates, there have been 116 cases of Ebola, including 77 deaths, in the DRC.

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Congo,ebola
A Congolese health worker administers Ebola vaccine to a boy who had contact with an Ebola sufferer in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. VOA

Government authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo say 250 schools in North Kivu and Ituri provinces will open their doors to more than 82,500 children when the new school year begins Monday.

These areas are the epicenter of the latest Ebola epidemic in DRC. The Ebola virus is extremely contagious. It can spread quickly through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids of infected people.

UNICEF says it is scaling up operations in the region to promote prevention measures. It says school principals and teachers will receive training on Ebola prevention and protection and on how to educate children on good hygiene practices to avoid the spread of the virus.

Congo, school
A World Health Organization (WHO) worker administers a vaccination during the launch of a campaign aimed at beating an outbreak of Ebola in Mbandaka, Democratic Republic of Congo, May 21, 2018. VOA

Spokesman Christophe Boulierac said UNICEF and its partners had reached more than 2 million people with Ebola prevention messages since the start of the outbreak on August 1.

“An increasing number of communities are now aware about Ebola and … they know better how to prevent its transmission,” Boulierac said. “The active involvement of concerned communities is key to stopping the spread of the disease. So, we are working closely with them to promote handwashing and good hygiene practices.”

According to the latest World Health Organization estimates, there have been 116 cases of Ebola, including 77 deaths, in the DRC. UNICEF said children make up an unusually high proportion of people affected by the disease. It noted that 24 percent of confirmed cases were in people under age 24.

Congo, school
A family sits outside in a neighborhood where three people died of Ebola in Mbandaka, Congo,
VOA

Also Read: Congo’s New Ebola Outbreak Is A Great Risk: WHO

Boulierac said more than 150 psychosocial workers had been trained to help comfort children infected with the disease in treatment centers. He said they also would support children who were discharged as free of Ebola but were at risk of stigmatization upon returning to their communities. (VOA)

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