Monday December 17, 2018
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Six new Indian schools to open in Qatar

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

Qatar which is home to around 600,000 expatriate Indians is soon going to have six Indian schools. These Indian schools are among 91 new private schools which have been given a approval to function by authorities in Qatar.

With the fees being on lower side, the move will help parents get admission for their wards, said a senior at the Supreme Education Council (SEC), while relaxing some of the admission procedures for private school students, The Peninsula newspaper reported.

The SEC has given initial approval to 91 new private schools to open in the next academic year, including six Indian schools, senior SEC official Ms Aisha Al Hashmi disclosed. Ms Aisha hinted that some existing Indian schools would open new branches very soon, probably by the next month.

By September 2015, six Indian schools will open, some of them will be only kindergartens and others will have classes for other grades as well. Schools which were not allowed to admit more students due to lack of seats will soon open branches, it could be even by April before the Indian Schools start their academic year, she said while addressing a news conference on Sunday.

The new schools will be an alternative option for parents and their fees will be lower compared to some other private schools, she added.

A total of 145,000 students are presently studying at private schools and 23,000 of them are Qataris.

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Here’s How Support From School May Help ADHD Children

While research shows that medication is effective, it does not work for all children, and is not acceptable to some families

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ADHD
How school support may help ADHD children. Pixabay

One-to-one support and a focus on self-regulation may improve academic outcomes of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests.

ADHD refers to a chronic condition including attention difficulty, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

“Children with ADHD are of course all unique. It’s a complex issue and there is no one-size-fits-all approach,” said Tamsin Ford, Professor from the the University of Exeter in the UK.

“However, our research gives the strongest evidence to date that non-drug interventions in schools can support children to meet their potential in terms of academic and other outcomes,” said Ford.

For the study, published in the journal Review of Education, the team found 28 randomised control trials on non-drug measures to support children with ADHD in schools.

child, ADHD
The results indicate that children with ADHD who received canine assisted intervention (CAI) experienced a reduction in inattention and an improvement in social skills. Pixabay

They found that important aspects of successful interventions for improving the academic outcomes of children are when they focus on self-regulation and are delivered in one-to-one sessions.

According to the study, self-regulation is hard for children who are very impulsive and struggle to focus attention.

In addition, the children were set daily targets which were reviewed via a card that the child carried between home and school and between lessons in school and rewards were given for meeting targets.

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While research shows that medication is effective, it does not work for all children, and is not acceptable to some families.

“More and better quality research is needed but in the mean-time, schools should try daily report cards and to increase children’s ability to regulate their emotions. These approaches may work best for children with ADHD by one-to-one delivery,” Ford noted. (IANS)