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Snapchat Introduces New Feature Now users Can Delete Chat Messages

This feature may boost the app usage

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Snapchat Introduces New Feature Now users Can Delete Chat Messages
Snapchat Introduces New Feature Now users Can Delete Chat Messages, pixabay

Photo-messaging app Snapchat is reportedly rolling out a new feature called “clear chats” that will allow users to delete messages from personal and group chat-threads.

The new feature is aimed at making people more comfortable sending sensitive information over Snapchat.

This could also check cases of revenge porn and blackmails where hackers or others threat and expose abusive conversations and personal images, TechCrunch reported on Monday.

“Hold down on a text, image, video, memory, sticker or audio note in a one-on-one or group chat, you’ll see a ‘delete’ button. Tap it and Snapchat will try to retract the message, though it admits it won’t always work if the recipient lacks an internet connection or updated version of the app,” the report added.

snapchat
Snapchat, pixabay

 

This feature may boost the app usage after it hit its slowest growth rate ever last quarter beacuse of Snapchat’s globally criticised redesign.

Also read: Snapchat Rolls Out Lens Which Reacts to Sound

Snapchat is reportedly working to roll out the “clear chats” feature globally over the next few weeks. (IANS)

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UNICEF to Bring 11,000 Lower-Income South Africa High School Girls in Tech Industries

Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa

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UNICEF
Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa. But for the last decade, a homegrown, UNICEF-supported program has worked to bring 11,000 lower-income high school girls into these industries. VOA

Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa. But for the last decade, a homegrown, UNICEF-supported program has worked to bring 11,000 lower-income high school girls into these industries.

Among those students was Raquel Sorota. Sorota has come a long way from her humble upbringing in Johannesburg’s Tembisa township. She now works as a risk engineer at a top South African insurance company.

She was those one of those South African high school girls who went through the UNICEF-supported TechnoGirls program, which started in 2005. She was selected for the program in 2009. Now 24, she says it changed her life.

“My life has literally never been the same again,” she said. “So, before the program, I wanted to be a doctor and today I’m an engineer, through that program. So I think a lot of what I think I took from that program was how it exposed me to the world of engineering. I think for the longest time I never knew how broad that world was and that I could have a place in that world, most importantly.”

Bright, disadvantaged girls

The program selects bright high school girls from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, gives them exposure to professions in science, technology, engineering and math, pairs them with mentors, and follows them through their university studies.

The program’s founder, Staff Sithole, says this is about much more than creating a new crop of workers. This, she says, is about changing the world — and who runs it.

“It is more an instrument, or a program, which is contributing towards gender equality. So rather than just running advocacy programs, let’s come with something that can change the circumstances, can be a purposeful targeted intervention of contributing towards gender equality,” she said.

Challenging obstacles

For high school students Gugulethu Zungu and Queen Makaile, the obstacles are more than just lack of opportunity. Both are physically challenged; they were both born with different, rare genetic defects that have affected their appearance and their health. Both were chosen to participate in the program this year for their high grades in math and science.

Zungu says the program led her to identify her dream career — forensics — but also to expand her horizons.

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“I like investigating and solving mysteries. And it actually makes me believe that, indeed, nothing is impossible. You just have to think out of the box,” she said.

Makaile, who has struggled with hearing and vision problems as a result of her rare defect that has also given her asymmetrical facial features, says she now wants to be come a journalist, to show the world that her thoughts matter more than her looks. For these girls, nothing, they say, will stand in their way. (VOA)