Wednesday March 20, 2019
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Spam Causing Bug Gets Fixed By Facebook

Numerous people report they have shared an update on their page, only to find that it has disappeared after it has been posted.

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Facebook
Facebook releases Messenger redesign on Android, iOS. Pixabay

A day after some users complained about their Facebook posts being marked as spam, Facebook on Saturday said it has fixed the bug that caused the problem.

“We have fixed a bug that caused some posts to be incorrectly marked as spam. We’ve restored the posts that were affected and are very sorry this happened,” Facebook said in a tweet.

Even journalist and author Salena Zito’s New York Post article, entitled “Why Trump’s supporters won’t care about Cohen and Manafort,” was flagged as spam and removed from Facebook.

She wrote in NY Post on Friday about Facebook censoring her article.

Facebook, spam
Facebook has over 2.2 billion users globally. IANS

Facebook replied to her in a tweet: “Hi Salena, a bug caused some posts to be incorrectly marked as spam and removed. We’ve fixed the issue and restored the posts. We’re really sorry this happened”.

“Regarding my story being taken down on my Facebook page (as well as many others) and marked as spam or not up to Community Standards Facebook has responded approximately 14 hours after I inquired as to why. It was a bug,” Zito later tweeted.

Meanwhile, there were other reports that claimed Facebook posts appeared to be deleting themselves, even after people have posted them.

Also Read: Facebook Bans a Quiz App Over Misused Data

“Numerous people report they have shared an update on their page, only to find that it has disappeared after it has been posted,” The Independent reported on Friday.

Facebook, which has over 2.2 billion users globally, was yet to comment on this. (IANS)

Next Story

4,000 Viewed NZ Mosques Shootings Live, Claims Facebook

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram

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facebook, social media
Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. Facebook said it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. VOA

Facing the flak over its inability to spot and remove the livestreaming of New Zealand mosque’s shooting, Facebook on Tuesday said 4,000 people viewed it before being taken down.

“The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast,” Chris Sonderby, VP and Deputy General Counsel, said in a blog-post. “Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4,000 times in total before being removed from Facebook,” Sonderby added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcasted graphic footage of shooting via Facebook Live for nearly 17 minutes. It was later shared in millions on other social media platforms.

Fifty people were killed in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian national Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

According to Facebook, the first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended. “Before we were alerted to the video, a user on ‘8chan’ posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site,” said Sonderby.

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

“We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface,” he said.

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram.

Also Read- Netflix Not to Integrate its Services with Apple Streaming Platform

“Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems, including the use of audio technology,” Sonderby said.

“In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services,” he said. (IANS)