Sunday January 19, 2020

Stress won’t give you cancer

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New York, Stressful events are not associated with cancer, researchers have said, adding that people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are not at the risk of developing the deadly disease.

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The large population sample study by researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) also showed no strong evidence of associations even among select groups of the population.
“The general public may have a perception that stress contributes to cancer occurrence,” said corresponding author Jaimie L. Gradus, assistant professor of psychiatry and epidemiology.

“This study, however, provided no evidence that a severe chronic stress disorder such as PTSD is associated with cancer incidence,” he added.
According to the researchers, the large sample and long study period allowed them to examine associations that have not been studied previously as they were able to look at rare cancer outcomes and associations among important subgroups.
Researchers compared the rate of various cancer diagnoses among people with PTSD with the standardized cancer rate from the general population in the same time period.

The association between stress and cancer has been discussed in scientific literature for more than 70 years.
Despite plausible theories that would support this association, findings from clinical research have been mixed.
The paper appeared in the European Journal of Epidemiology.

(IANS)

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Most Advanced Radiation Therapy For Cancer Patients Arrives in India

With the most recent introduction of Radixact X9, radiation oncology has reached a new horizon in the race of effective curative treatment for cancer

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Cancer
Cancer Patients find it more comfortable to be treated under this technology owing to the rotational helical mechanism, also the set-up time is lesser as compared to other therapies. Pixabay

Indraprastha Apollo Hospital in New Delhi on Friday launched the most advanced version of TomoTherapy Radixact X9– the smartest radiation therapy to treat the most complicated cancer tumours.

Tomotherapy comes as a boon for cancer treatment since it has a higher degree of precision, speed and accuracy.

Patients find it more comfortable to be treated under this technology owing to the rotational helical mechanism, also the set-up time is lesser as compared to other therapies.

“The launch of the most advanced version of the Tomotherapy technology is truly a remarkable development in the field of Radiation Oncology. This will be a revolutionary step in the treatment of cancer. With this system we can deliver both fractionated radiotherapy as well as SBRT and Radiosurgery,” said Suneeta Reddy, Managing Director, Apollo Hospitals Group.

“The new generation radiation machine and our highly experienced team enables us to move ahead towards precise and personalised care, therefore improving the quality of life of cancer patients and ensure better clinical outcomes,” Reddy added.

Tomotherapy is effective in treating cancer, irrespective of the stage, especially multiple metastasis. The best outcomes are for treatment of bilateral breast cancer, paediatric oncology and all other forms of cancer.

Cancer
Indraprastha Apollo Hospital in New Delhi on Friday launched the most advanced version of TomoTherapy Radixact X9– the smartest radiation therapy to treat the most complicated cancer tumours. Pixabay

“We are taking precision and excellence to the next level with the revolutionary Radixact-X9: Tomotherapy, system powered by state-of-the-art 3D CT imaging. It uses a linear accelerator to deliver high-dose radiation to the tumour with sub-millimetre precision,” said P ShivaKumar, Managing Director, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals.

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“With the most recent introduction of Radixact X9, radiation oncology has reached a new horizon in the race of effective curative treatment for cancer. Large field size can be targeted at once. 1.35 cms of length can be targeted without repositioning the machine,” ShivaKumar added. (IANS)