Thursday June 21, 2018

Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From ‘Surgery in a Pill’

Novel 'surgery in a pill' to reverse diabetes

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Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From 'Surgery in a Pill'
Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From 'Surgery in a Pill'. (IANS)
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Researchers have developed “surgery in a pill” that can reduce post-meal blood sugar spikes and help reverse diabetes.

When the pill was administered in rats, it delivered a substance that could temporarily coat the intestine, forming a thin barrier that alters nutrient contact and lowers blood glucose response after a meal, the researchers said.

“We envision a pill that a patient can take before a meal that transiently coats the gut to replicate the effects of surgery,” said Jeff Karp, a bioengineer at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) in Massachusetts, US.

After a meal, blood sugar levels rise and can stay elevated over time.

However, one hour after the pill was administered to the rats, the response to glucose was lowered by 47 per cent.

“What we’ve developed here is essentially, ‘surgery in a pill’,” added Yuhan Lee, a materials scientist in the BWH.

This response was temporary, and after three hours, the effect essentially disappeared, the study showed.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Nature Materials, the team selected a substance known as sucralfate — an FDA-approved drug that is used in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers — to adhere to the small intestine and then dissolve within a matter of hours.

Further, the team engineered the substance into a novel material that can coat the lining of the intestine without requiring activation by gastric acid.

The engineered compound, referred to as LuCI (Luminal Coating of the Intestine), can be made into a dry powdered form that can be encapsulated as a pill.

Also Read: Thyroid Dysfunction May Lead to Diabetes During Pregnancy

“We’ve used a bioengineering approach to formulate a pill that has good adhesion properties and can attach nicely to the gut in a preclinical model. And after a couple of hours, its effects dissipate,” Lee said.

The team is now testing the effect of short-and long-term use of LuCI in diabetic and obese rodent models. (IANS)

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients
Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients. Pixabay

Plant-based diets can be beneficial for diabetes as a new study has found that it may improve glycemic control, cholesterol and lead to weight loss in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The researchers suggest that plant-based diets benefit both glycemic control and cardiovascular health because they are low in saturated fat, rich in phytochemicals, high in fibre and often rich in low-glycemic fruits and vegetables.

“The link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease is strong. 60-70 per cent of people who have Type 2 diabetes die of heart disease,” said co-author Hana Kahleova, Director of Clinical Research at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington DC.

“The good news is that this study shows that the same simple prescription — eating a plant-based diet — can reduce our risk for heart problems and improve Type 2 diabetes at the same time,” Kahleova added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes.

For the study, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition, the researchers reviewed nine randomised controlled trials — nearly 700 participants — that assessed the effectiveness of vegan and vegetarian diets for diabetes patients.

Also Read: Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From ‘Surgery in a Pill’

The results suggested that those who ate a plant-based diet lowered their cholesterol, lost weight, lowered HbA1c levels, and improved other cardiometabolic risk factors when compared to those who ate a non-vegetarian diet.

There was no significant effect on fasting insulin, HDL-C, triglycerides or blood pressure. The overall certainty of evidence was moderate but was low for fasting insulin, triglycerides, and waist circumference. (IANS)