Wednesday October 24, 2018

Study: Eggs & high-cholesterol diet won’t risk your heart

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London: A new study by researchers said, eating an egg a day and having a high-cholesterol diet habit will not increase heart attack risk. It will not affect people inclined even genetically.

 

Relatively higher intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating an egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease or with the thickening of the common carotid artery walls, the study said.

Frequent consumption of eggs does not increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases even in persons who are genetically predisposed to a greater effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels, the research showed.

Furthermore, no association was found among those with the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism, the findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed.

The dietary habits of 1,032 men aged between 42 and 60 years and with no baseline diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland.

During a follow-up of 21 years, 230 men had a heart attack, and 32.5 percent of the study participants were carriers of APOE4.

In the highest control group, the study participants had an average daily dietary cholesterol intake of 520 mg and they consumed an average of one egg per day.(IANS)

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  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Which eggs are used in the clinical study ?-are they organic ?

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A Healthy Diet Can Help The Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: Study

The team measured body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of the study.

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diet, bipolar
Diet, weight may influence bipolar disorder treatment Flickr

Consuming a healthy balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables can benefit those undergoing treatment for bipolar disorders, a new study suggests.

Bipolar disorder — previously known as ‘manic depression’ — is characterised by episodes of depression and of abnormally elevated mood with periods in between the two extremes.

“We found that people who had a better-quality diet, a diet with anti-inflammatory properties, or a lower BMI, showed better response to add-on nutraceutical treatment than those who reported a low-quality diet, or a diet including foods that promote inflammation, or who were overweight,” said lead researcher Melanie Ashton of Deakin University in Australia.

fibre, bipolar
Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice. Pixabay

The fact that there are two opposite sets of symptoms means that finding an effective treatment is difficult, suggests the study presented at the ECNP Conference in Barcelona.

While current medications are useful, they are better at targeting mania symptoms (the ‘up’ phase), leaving a lack of effective treatment for people experiencing depressive episodes, it added.

For the study, the team involved 133 participants who either took a combination of nutraceuticals (compounds derived from foods such as vitamins or minerals that treat or prevent a disease or disorder) including the anti-inflammatory amino acid n-acetylcysteine (NAC), or NAC alone, or a placebo (a dummy pill) for 16 weeks.

fibre, bipolar
Eat good food. Pixabay

The team measured body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of the study, and then measured depression and how a person is able to function in their day to day life.

The participants filled in a questionnaire about what they usually eat over the year and researchers calculated a diet quality score where good diets included a healthy diet with lots of fruit and vegetables, whereas poorer-quality diets had more saturated fat, refined carbohydrates and alcohol.

Also Read: A Diet rich in Nutrients Helps in Living Longer: Study

“If we can confirm these results, then it is good news for people with bipolar disorder, as there is a great need for better treatments for the depressive phase of bipolar disorder,” Ashton noted. (IANS)