Sunday December 15, 2019

Study: Eggs & high-cholesterol diet won’t risk your heart

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London: A new study by researchers said, eating an egg a day and having a high-cholesterol diet habit will not increase heart attack risk. It will not affect people inclined even genetically.

 

Relatively higher intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating an egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease or with the thickening of the common carotid artery walls, the study said.

Frequent consumption of eggs does not increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases even in persons who are genetically predisposed to a greater effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels, the research showed.

Furthermore, no association was found among those with the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism, the findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed.

The dietary habits of 1,032 men aged between 42 and 60 years and with no baseline diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland.

During a follow-up of 21 years, 230 men had a heart attack, and 32.5 percent of the study participants were carriers of APOE4.

In the highest control group, the study participants had an average daily dietary cholesterol intake of 520 mg and they consumed an average of one egg per day.(IANS)

  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Which eggs are used in the clinical study ?-are they organic ?

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You’ll Soon Require to Increase Your Calorie Intake in Order To Remain Healthy

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent

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In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more Calorie Intake is required to maintain the higher weight. Pixabay

As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global calorie requirements globally, find researchers.

In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more needs to be eaten to maintain the higher weight.

Even if both BMI and height were to remain constant, global calorie requirements would still increase by more than 60 per cent by 2100 because of population growth, said the team from the University of Gottingen in Germany in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The development economist Professor Stephan Klasen and his then doctoral Lutz Depenbusch have designed a scenario to investigate how calorie intake could develop between 2010 and 2100.

Earlier changes in the Netherlands and Mexico were used as a benchmark.

“The developments in these countries are very pronounced,” says Depenbusch, “but they do represent a realistic scenario.”

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent.

This means, the increase in global calorie requirements between 2010 and 2100 would be one third larger, reaching a total increase of nearly 80 per cent, said the researchers.

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As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global Calorie requirements globally, find researchers. Wikimedia Commons

If global food production does not meet this increased need, this problem will not be controlled by a corresponding decrease in BMI.

While richer people will be able to maintain their eating habits, the poor would suffer greatly from higher prices due to increased demand.

ALSO READ: Genetics Can Affect The Way We Taste Food: Study

“This would lead to increased consumption of cheap food, often rich in calories but poor in nutrients,” said Depenbusch.

“As a result, body weight among the poor would continue to rise alongside malnutrition and poorer health outcomes.” (IANS)