Friday February 23, 2018

Study: Eggs & high-cholesterol diet won’t risk your heart

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London: A new study by researchers said, eating an egg a day and having a high-cholesterol diet habit will not increase heart attack risk. It will not affect people inclined even genetically.

 

Relatively higher intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating an egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease or with the thickening of the common carotid artery walls, the study said.

Frequent consumption of eggs does not increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases even in persons who are genetically predisposed to a greater effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels, the research showed.

Furthermore, no association was found among those with the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism, the findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed.

The dietary habits of 1,032 men aged between 42 and 60 years and with no baseline diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland.

During a follow-up of 21 years, 230 men had a heart attack, and 32.5 percent of the study participants were carriers of APOE4.

In the highest control group, the study participants had an average daily dietary cholesterol intake of 520 mg and they consumed an average of one egg per day.(IANS)

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  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Which eggs are used in the clinical study ?-are they organic ?

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Heart Attack Symptoms In Women Often Misinterpreted

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients

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Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related. Pexels

Young women who report heart attack symptoms such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms, were more likely than men to have them dismissed by their doctors as not heart related, raising their risk of death than similarly aged men, finds a new study.

Previous studies have reported that women were less likely to present with chest pain for acute myocardial infarction — commonly known as a heart attack — but more likely to report a wider variety of symptoms and also more likely to die in a hospital from the disease.

“When young women with multiple risk factors visit their doctor with any chest discomfort or other symptoms that may be associated with ischemic heart disease”, doctors should treat them appropriately, said Gail D’Onofrio from the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH).

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients (2,009 women and 976 men) who were 55 years and younger and were hospitalized for heart attack.

heart attack
The analysis showed that the majority of both men and women reported chest pain, pressure, tightness, or discomfort as their main heart attack symptoms. Pexels

 

Yet, women were more likely than men to report other associated symptoms of heart attack, such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms.

ALSO READ: Memory of a heart attack gets stored in genes through epigenetic changes

Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related, the researchers said.

“Although chest pain was the most common symptom for young women and men, the presentation of chest pain within the context of multiple symptoms may influence the prompt recognition of heart disease for these young patients,” said Judith H. Lichtman, associate professor at the YSPH. (IANS)

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