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Study reveals than Sensational Tweets are more popular than substantive Content

Analyzing tweets sent before, during and after the US Presidential elections, a study has shown Twitter has become more of a tabloid these days

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New York, Feb 20, 2017: Sensational tweets have more staying power than substantive posts on the microblogging platform Twitter, says a study.

In other words, posts about provocative topics are retweeted more by users, thereby making Twitter appear more like a tabloid than a substantive discussion forum for a casual user, the study suggests.

 The findings are based on analysis of tweets sent before, during and after the Republican primary debates leading up to the 2016 US presidential election.

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“Whereas during the debate tweets focused on a mix of substantive topics, the tweets that had the longest staying power after the debates were those that focused on the more sensationalist news events, often through pictures and videos,” said the study by researchers from University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University in the US.

“As such, a user coming to Twitter after the debate was over would have encountered a different topical and emotional landscape than one who had been following the site in real-time, one more closely resembling a tabloid than a substantive discussion forum,” the study said.

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The study found that entertaining or sensational posts wash out more substantive tweets overtime, The Daily Pennsylvanian reported on Monday.

Twitter has a greater impact on political discourse than other social mediaplatforms because Twitter users often see content from people they do not know, one of the study authors Ron Berman from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, was quoted as saying.

Twitter users can search using a hashtag or trending topic to see public tweets from a diverse population of users. (IANS)


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Twitter reportedly working on Snap-like ad feature

The company reported $87 million in data licensing and other non-advertising revenue, up 10 percent from a year earlier

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  • Twitter is working on a camera-first feature
  • This feature is similar to that of Snapchat
  • This can cause a clash between the two apps

Twitter is reportedly working on a camera-first feature that will let advertisers combine location-based photos and videos with “Twitter Moments” — curated stories about whats happening around — to sponsor events or place ads in between tweeted posts, media reported. According to a report in CNBC on Thursday, the move is seen to rival Snap Inc. which has been popular with advertisers.

Twitter will now also have the camera-first feature.

“With this change, the emphasis on the platform would change from text to video and images, giving advertisers a competitor to one of Snap’s most popular advertising opportunities,” three senior agency executives familiar with the development were quoted as saying in the report.

Snap collects location-based snaps around certain topics and displays them together as a highlighted post on its Discover tab — a feature that has proven popular with advertisers. Twitter’s feature would work in a similar way in Twitter Moments.

However, it is unclear when the feature would launch and it could still be refined significantly or scrapped entirely, the report said. Twitter has been going after new advertising business after it posted its first profit.

Also Read: Facebook, Twitter Urged to Do More to Police Hate on Sites

The company reported $87 million in data licensing and other non-advertising revenue, up 10 percent from a year earlier.

Ad revenue rose one percent to $644 million. Twitter reported a net profit of $91.1 million, compared to a loss of $167.1 million, a year earlier. IANS

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