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Study: Supportive Relationships Can Help You Face up Challenges

It's a supportive relationship that makes people more likely to give themselves the chance to succeed

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Supportive relationship
Holding Hands in relationship. Pixabay
  • People with supportive partners are more likely to take on potentially rewarding challenges, suggests a study
  • Participants with discouraging partners expressed a lack of confidence
  • The researchers found that the most supportive partners showed enthusiasm about the opportunity and encouraged their partners

Washington, Aug 12, 2017: According to a recent study, it’s a supportive relationship that makes people more likely to give themselves the chance to succeed.

The Carnegie Mellon University psychologists found that people with supportive partners were more likely to take on potentially rewarding challenges and experienced more personal growth, happiness, psychological well-being and better relationship functioning months later after accepting those challenges.

Lead author of the study, Brooke Feeney said, “We found support for the idea that the choices people make at these specific decision points, such as pursuing a work opportunity or seeking out new friends, matter a lot for their long-term well-being”, mentioned ANI.

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The research was carried on 163 married couples that provided one member of each couple with a choice- either to solve a simple puzzle or compete for a prize by giving a speech. The researchers then recorded the couples’ communications as they decided whether to take challenges.

It was noted that participants with more supportive and encouraging partners were more in favor of competing for the prize, while those with discouraging partners expressed a lack of confidence. Six months later, those who attempted the more challenging task reported having more personal growth, happiness, psychological well-being, and better relationships than those who didn’t.

The researchers found that the most supportive partners showed enthusiasm about the opportunity, encouraged their partners, and talked about the potential benefits of taking on the challenge.

Feeny adds, “Significant others can help you thrive through embracing life opportunities. Or they can hinder your ability to thrive by making it less likely that you’ll pursue opportunities for growth.”

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New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

Parks near home good for your mental health

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parks
Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being. Pixabay

Living within 300 metres of urban green space such as parks, nature reserves or play areas is associated with greater happiness, sense of worth and life satisfaction, says a new study.

Using data from UK government’s Annual Population Survey (APS) of 25,518 people, the researchers show that people who live within 300 metres of green space have significantly better mental well-being.

“A lot of research focuses on poor mental health, or single aspects of well-being like life satisfaction. What makes our work different is the way we consider multi-dimensional mental well-being in terms of happiness, life satisfaction and worth,” said Victoria Houlden from the University of Warwick.

The study, published in the journal Applied Geography, found that there is a very strong relationship between the amount of green space around a person’s home and their feelings of life satisfaction, happiness, and self-worth.

parks
The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health. Pixabay

Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being.

The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health.

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“By combining advanced statistical and mapping methods, we’ve shown that the effect is real and substantial. Basically we’ve proven what everyone has always assumed was true,” said Scott Weich, Professor at the University of Sheffield. (IANS)