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Improves balance, and posture. Strengthens back and legs.

By Grand Master Akshar

Yoga should be started as early as possible but it also is never too late to begin your practice. Making it a part of your routine can help you age gracefully. Not only does yoga help with the physical aspects of your health, but it also aids in mental, emotional, and spiritual development.

Yoga for Mental Well-being

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Yoga can also help to reduce any form of stress, depression, anxiety, and other mental health-related issues. You can practice Surya Namaskar, yoga mudras, pranayama, and meditation along with physical postures. it helps you to preserve memory and even improve concentration and focus.

Follow a safe practice

Yoga for elders and senior citizens should be done by taking all the necessary precautions. If you have recently undergone surgery or if you suffer from any injury please begin your practice only after taking the necessary approval of your medical practitioner. Certain poses like the plank pose should be done with great care if you suffer from any wrist weakness or injury. Please consider using wristbands, kneecaps, or any other form of protection to help you practice safely.

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Depressed person is thinking and sitting alone

These days everywhere you look, you spot people talking about things not going right or how they feel stressed and "depressed". Depression has hit society in the worst way ever - right from adults to kids being impacted by it at different intensities. Research shows that 1 in every 5 people goes through depression or mental health issues in any given year.

Before we understand what depression is, let's clarify at the outset what it isn't. Depression is not feeling sad or feeling depressed momentarily. Unknowingly, we stereotypically portray depression as sadness with the extensive usage of the word.

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Dr. Chandni Tugnait, a psychotherapist, life and business coach, and founder-director of Gateway of Healing says, depression is not being unhappy; it is not anger, fear or loneliness - it is none of these individually and yet it is all of these and much more.

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Researchers found that among depressed patients, depression screening scores were higher during the pandemic than before it.

Depression remained common during the pandemic and worsened for some patients leading to increased visits to the emergency department for the treatment of anxiety and chest pain, finds a new study. The study found that nearly 40 per cent of patients studied reported new or continuing symptoms of depression during the first year of the pandemic in the US. "These findings are significant. In looking at the first year of the pandemic, we are already seeing the mental health effects on our patients," said researcher Heidi T. May from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute. "We know that it is a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease; and if people are becoming more depressed because of the pandemic, in a few years, we could see a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease," May added.

For the study, the team examined 4,633 patients who completed a depression screening that is a standard part of primary care, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. "Before" was between March 1, 2019, to February 29, 2020, and "during" was between March 1, 2020, and April 20, 2021. Patients were separated into two groups -- those with no depression/no longer depressed, and those who remained depressed/became depressed.

Using electronic health records, patients were then assessed for follow-up emergency department visits for anxiety and chest pain, said the study, presented at the American Heart Association's virtual 2021 Scientific Session. Researchers found that among depressed patients, depression screening scores were higher during the pandemic than before it. Depression was also associated with increased emergency department visits for anxiety. They found that the odds of visiting an emergency room for anxiety was 2.8 greater for people with depression than those without, and 1.8 greater for anxiety with chest pains compared to non-depressed patients.(IANS/ MBI)


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Research shows that 1 in every 5 people goes through depression or mental health issues in any given year.

By IANSlife

These days everywhere you look, you spot people talking about things not going right or how they feel stressed and "depressed". Depression has hit society in the worst way ever - right from adults to kids being impacted by it at different intensities. Research shows that 1 in every 5 people goes through depression or mental health issues in any given year. Before we understand what depression is, let's clarify at the outset what it isn't. Depression is not feeling sad or feeling depressed momentarily. Unknowingly, we stereotypically portray depression as sadness with the extensive usage of the word. Dr. Chandni Tugnait, a psychotherapist, life and business coach, and founder-director of Gateway of Healing says, depression is not being unhappy; it is not anger, fear or loneliness - it is none of these individually and yet it is all of these and much more.
Depression is being numb. It is nothingness. It is exhausting. It takes away all motivation and leaves a feeling of hopelessness. There is a lack of energy - it's more like a void where nothing grows or changes, where time does not exist, where there is nothing and no one. Of course, it is difficult for the person trying to cope with it as well as for the people around them. Sometimes depression is chronic and evident but a lot of times one isn't aware of it and sometimes one is even able to camouflage it in the garb of routine & forced positivity - this last type, by the way, is the worst as sometimes we lose them to suicide - just like that - no warning, no sign, as per Dr. Tugnait.

person drowning in water Depression is being numb. It is nothingness. It is exhausting. It takes away all motivation and leaves a feeling of hopelessness. | Photo by Stormseeker on Unsplash



The line between clinical depression and feeling depressed is quite fragile and often we find inappropriate self-diagnosis in this regard. Clinical depression is accompanied by a feeling of impending doom without any reason, every day, for over two weeks continuously along with fatigue, loss of interest, insomnia, etc. However, one may feel depressed for a while due to a difficult event like losing a job/loved one, etc. and may confuse it for depression and begin to pop pills. It's important to be aware of the difference - the ability to get up and fight back against these feelings, instead of accepting them or thinking that they will simply go away on their own or never go away. The deeper the roots of depression, the more time it takes for a person to heal. It keeps a person in the loop of being low and makes them self-damaging. The symptoms could range from crying all day to being unable to get up from the bed to work, bathe, or even eat.

Then there are the happy and high functioning depressed people who have smiling depression. A high functioning depressed person appears energetic, carefree and cheery on the outside, most of the time and people close to them never get to know that on the inside they are being sucked into a black hole. Strangely, they would go out of their way to keep others happy, masking their own sadness. When alone, they cry, contemplate suicide and feel exhausted from all the pretending. Why do they pretend? Well, it's funny that each time we ask someone, "How are you?", we are looking at "I am fine, thank you" as the response because if someone starts sharing how they really are, we are quick to tell them not to sulk or look at the bright side. Sharing and sulking are two different things. The fear of being judged is deeply ingrained in our beings and hence it seems like a better proposition to endure the depression in silence than to voice it out.

a person crying The symptoms of depression could range from crying all day to being unable to get up from the bed to work, bathe, or even eat. | Photo by Claudia Wolff on Unsplash

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