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Typically, Glaucoma occurs in people with over the age of 60 however it can occur at any age.

By IANSlife

Have you ever faced eye redness? Or have witnessed blurry or foggy vision? Or experiencing halos around lights? Or nausea and vomiting are very common for you. You may well be suffering from Glaucoma which needs immediate attention.

Glaucoma is the second most common causes of blindness worldwide, according to a report by World Health Organisation (WHO). Typically, it occurs in people with over the age of 60 however it can occur at any age. It is also estimated that globally 79.6 million people are affected with glaucoma, half of them being Asian population. While in India, around 11.9 million people suffer vision impairment and out of which 1.2 million cases are due to Glaucoma. It is a growing concern for the population in India. Even after these high numbers, the enormous majority remains undiagnosed, and untreated. More than 90 percent of cases of Glaucoma remain undiagnosed.

Pink eye Glaucoma is the second most common causes of blindness worldwide, according to a report by World Health Organisation (WHO). | Wikimedia Commons

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Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study.

Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, found there was, on average, a 17 per cent improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week.

However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. "We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally," said lead author, Glen Jeffery from the University College London.

woman wearing glasses measuring device Using a provided LED device, all participants were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m | Photo by Hush Naidoo Jade Photography on Unsplash

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Photo by Harpreet Singh on Unsplash

Ananthalakshmi. N, Head-Education & Professional Services, Essilor India lists out ways to help keep eyes healthy:

Our eyes play an important role in our lives. They are the sensors that relay information about the environment to our brain. Eyes alert the brain to the prospect of both a safe environment and lurking danger. Our eyes work all the time - from getting out of bed in the morning to sleeping at night. In modern lives, we have another source of strain on our eyes - mobile phones, laptops and TVs. Studies have shown that unabated exposure to light emitted by these gadgets are harmful for our eyes.

Why eyesight could take a hit?
Technically, our eyesight can take a beating from refractive errors, the normal aging phenomenon (presbyopia, where individuals at 40+ years face difficulty in reading the small print on medicine bottles, and packet contents, among others), eye problems/diseases/infections, and injuries. Natural light is very important for our eyes to remain healthy. In children, a lack of time outdoors could increase their chances of developing short-sightedness. If you notice your eyesight is deteriorating, the most important thing to do is to immediately visit your eye care practitioner for an eye examination / eye test. The practitioner will be able to identify underlying issues that are causing the eyesight to go bad.

Ananthalakshmi. N, Head-Education & Professional Services, Essilor India lists out ways to help keep eyes healthy:

• Eat right - Eat a healthy and balanced diet rich in Vitamin A

• Harmful Lights - Prevent your eyes from harmful radiations / light, especially ultra violet radiations & harmful blue lights

• Sun & the eyes - Sun is the biggest natural source of UV and Light. A healthy amount of sunrays are good for the eyes, looking at the sun directly can cause damage ? even lasting damage ? to the eyes.

• Artificial sources - Today, we all are exposed to a number of artificial sources of light, including LED/ LCD used in artificial lighting (bulbs / tube lights); displays on TVs, mobiles, laptops, desktops, etc. Though not as powerful as the sun, prolonged exposure / proximity to the eyes / angle of exposure, can cumulatively, have a negative impact on the eyes and its well-being.


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Digital eye strain can affect anyone with prolonged exposure to screens like smartphones, computers, TV, tablets and video games.

By Dr. Mohsina Mekhri

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought in its wake a burgeoning epidemic of digital eye strain. Digital eye strain can affect anyone with prolonged exposure to screens like smartphones, computers, TV, tablets and video games. Increased screen time has always been a cause for concern among parents and this worry has been intensified of late due to online schooling. Although parents were relieved that classes could continue online, their relief was short-lived as children started to complain of headaches, eye pain and discomfort due to increased screen time. Apart from the usage of devices for online classes, homework and assignments, children increasingly have no choice but to turn to the online platform for socialising with friends and entertainment. This results in screen time of more than 7-8 hours every day and its consequence-digital eye strain.

The commonly reported symptoms among children who suffer from digital eye strain are eye fatigue, eye discomfort, headaches, dry eyes, blurred vision and watering. Prolonged near work and reduced time spent outdoors has also resulted in the new onset of myopia (short-sightedness) and faster progression of myopia in young children.

With schools opting to adopt a hybrid model for the safety of children, prolonged screen time will continue to affect the eye health of students. Therefore, to minimise the adverse effects of increased screen time, it is important to take measures to manage eye strain at home.

As a first step, evaluate your child's virtual study environment and make adjustments if needed.


1. Distance between the eyes and the screen: Make sure the computer screen is about 1.5 to 2 feet or an arm's length away from where your child is seated. Adjust the device so that the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye level. This will ensure that your child is not tilting his/her neck to view the screen.

2. Adjust the light of the surroundings: The room should be well lit. There should not be too much difference between screen brightness and room lighting. Advise your child to avoid using electronic gadgets in the dark. Ensure there is no glare from the screen due to the reflection of light from a window or a light source in the room.

3. Adjust screen brightness: Parents should ensure that the brightness of the screen is optimal (not lighter or darker than the surroundings) and increase the contrast for better viewing. This will also avoid unnecessary strain.

man in white dress shirt and blue denim jeans sitting on bed To minimise the adverse effects of increased screen time, it is important to take measures to manage eye strain at home. | Photo by Towfiqu barbhuiya on Unsplash

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