Monday February 18, 2019

Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate

Stress and tension leads to fluctuation in heart rate

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Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate
Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate, Pixabay

Too much job pressure may increase your risk developing a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to a stroke, dementia, heart failure and other complications.

The study found that being stressed at work was associated with a 48 per cent higher risk of atrial fibrillation.

“Work stress has previously been linked with coronary heart disease. Work stress should be considered a modifiable risk factor for preventing atrial fibrillation and coronary heart disease,” said study author Eleonor Fransson from Jonkoping University in Sweden.

Blood pressure monitor
Blood pressure monitor, Pixabay

“People who feel stressed at work and have palpitations or other symptoms of atrial fibrillation should see their doctor and speak to their employer about improving the situation at work,” she explained.

Also read: Eat less saturated trans fats to curb heart disease who

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, included 13,200 participants enrolled into the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) in 2006, 2008, or 2010.

For the study, the team defined work stress as job strain, which refers to jobs with high psychological demands combined with low control over the work situation.

Participants were employed and had no history of atrial fibrillation, heart attack, or heart failure.

They also completed postal surveys on sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, and work-related factors which included questions on job demands and control.

Heart rate
Heart rate, Flickr

After a median follow-up of 5.7 years, the researchers identified that work stress was a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

“Atrial fibrillation is a common condition with serious consequences and therefore it is of major public health importance to find ways of preventing it,” Fransson explained.

The symptoms of atrial fibrillation, according to the authors, may include palpitations, weakness, fatigue, feeling light headed, dizziness, and shortness of breath. (IANS)

Next Story

Weigh Gain in Women Can Be Cause Due To High Stress Jobs: Study

Efforts to reduce work-related stress would likely achieve a decrease not only in weight gain but also in the incidence of ill health

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Indonesia, e-commerce, computer
Indonesian domestic workers attend a computer class during their day off at the Sekolah Indonesia Singapura (Indonesian School) in Singapore, Dec. 12, 2010. VOA

Are you gaining weight suddenly? Blame increased stress at workplace, say researchers who found that heavy pressure at work predisposes women to weight gain, irrespective of whether they have received an academic education.

The findings, led by the University of Gothenburg in Sweden researchers, showed that long-term exposure to high job demands played a part only for women. In just over half of the women who had been subjected to high demands, a major increase in weight took place over the 20 years.

This gain in weight was some 20 per cent higher than in women subject to low job demands.

stress
Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

On the other hand, women and men with a low degree of control in their work more frequently gained considerable weight, defined as a weight gain of 10 per cent or more.

“We were able to see that high job demands played a part in women’s weight gain, while for men there was no association between high demands and weight gain,” said lead author Sofia Klingberg, a researcher at the varsity.

“When it came to the level of demands at work, only the women were affected. We haven’t investigated the underlying causes, but it may conceivably be about a combination of job demands and the greater responsibility for the home that women often assume. This may make it difficult to find time to exercise and live a healthy life,” Klingberg added,

depression
Depression has significantly increased the risk of early death in women. Wikimedia

For the study, published in the journal International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, the team included 3,872 women and men who were investigated on three occasions over a 20-year period with respect to such variables as body weight and demands and control at work.

Also Read: Does Your Home or Office Have Enough Fire Safety?

They were followed either from age 30 to 50 or from 40 to 60.

Efforts to reduce work-related stress would likely achieve a decrease not only in weight gain but also in the incidence of ill health, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, the researchers noted. (IANS)